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    • Feedhorn

      Feedhorn

      The feedhorn is the part of a satellite dish system which gathers the reflected signal from the dish and focuses it towards the LNB. It is a type of horn antenna that is deployed to convey radio signals between the transceiver and the reflector antenna. Horn antennas basically effect a transition between waves propagating through

    • What is a MOSFET?

      What is a MOSFET?

      A MOSFET (Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor) is a device that switches or amplifies an electronic signal. MOSFET technology has made computers much smaller and more efficient than they once were by handling large amounts of electricity in very small spaces. MOSFETs are also crucial for both digital and analog signals and are found

    • ODU (Out-Door Unit)

      ODU (Out-Door Unit)

      ODU (Out-Door Unit) refers to the set of satellite equipment which is placed outside of the building. The ODU typically includes a satellite dish, a feedhorn, and a LNB (Low Noise Block). In bi-directional satellite systems, the ODU will also include a BUC (Block Up Convertor). The ODU is connected to the IDU (In-Door-Unit) by

    • GPS Jammer

      GPS Jammer

      GPS stands for Global Positioning System. It is used by individuals, commercial entities and the military for navigational purposes. GPS uses 24 satellites that orbit the earth and send radio signals. The GPS satellites work with a GPS receiver which today can be found in individual handheld units, car navigational systems, boat navigational systems, highly

    • Police Scanner Codes

      Police Scanner Codes

      A police scanner is basically a radio scanner that is also a receiver that receives wireless radio signals. A scanner identifies these wireless radio waves. A scanner can identify numerous radio signals and bands concurrently making it easy to keep track of many channels simultaneously. The phrase “police scanner” derives from the fact that the

    • What is EMI Shielding?

      What is EMI Shielding?

      Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) most commonly occurs in the 104 to 1012 Hertz frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum. A number of sources create this interference, including radio transmitters, electric motors, power lines, fluorescent lights, and computer circuits. If electrical equipment do not have suitable EMI shielding in place, device failure may result from the interference

    • Symbol Rate

      Symbol Rate

      The symbol rate is the rate of state changes on a communications circuit. If a circuit can carry two tones per second, the circuit has a symbol rate of two. Circuits then use different modulation techniques to carry multiple bits per symbol. If the circuit is limited to two different tones, the first tone can

    • VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal)

      VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal)

      VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal) is basically a two-way satellite ground station with a less than 3 meters tall (most of them are about 0.75 m to 1.2 m tall) dish antenna stationed. The transmission rates of VSATs are usually from very low up to 4 Mbit/s. These VSATs’ primary job is to access the

    • EMF Meters

      EMF Meters

      An EMF meter detects and measures an electromagnetic field. There are many types of EMF meters and they have many uses, including ghost hunting. Most EMF meters are “AC EMF meters” and can only detect the rate of change in an oscillating magnetic field. However, commercial grade EMF meters that can detect specific electromagnetic frequency

    • Who Invented the Radio?

      Who Invented the Radio?

      Radio was not invented by any single person, but instead was a culmination of several scientists’ research, each of whom pioneered a different area of electromagnetic radiation and radio waves during the late 1800s and early 1900s. Among these men are well known researchers such as Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, James Clerk Maxwell, David E. Hughes,

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