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    • LNB (Low Noise Block)

      LNB (Low Noise Block)

      An LNB (Low Noise Block aka LNC- Low Noise Converter) is used for communications (broadcast) satellite reception. The LNB is usually affixed either in or on the satellite dish. The LNB’s purpose is to utilize the super heterodyne effect and amplify and convert a wide block (band) of frequencies. This helps compensate the signal loss

    • Spark Gap

      Spark Gap

      A spark gap consists of two electrodes separated by a small gap that is filled by a gas, usually air. The potential difference across the gap increases until it reaches the level where the gas ionizes and current flows across it for a brief time. The two types of spark gap are the static and

    • What is a Phototransistor?

      What is a Phototransistor?

      A phototransistor is a device that converts light energy into electric energy. Phototransistors are similar to photoresistors but produce both current and voltage, while photoresistors only produce current. This is because a phototransistor is made of a bipolar semiconductor and focuses the energy that is passed through it. Photons (light particles) activate phototransistors and are

    • Ku Band

      Ku Band

      The Ku band (Kurtz-under band) is primarily used for satellite communications, particularly for editing and broadcasting satellite television. This band is split into multiple segments broken down into geographical regions, as the ITU (International Telecommunication Union) determines. The Ku band is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum in the microwave range of frequencies ranging from

    • C Band

      C Band

      C Band is the original frequency allocation for communications satellites. C-Band uses 3.7-4.2GHz for downlink and 5.925-6.425Ghz for uplink. The lower frequencies that C Band uses perform better under adverse weather conditions than the Ku band or Ka band frequencies. C Band Variants Slight C Band frequency variations are approved for use in various parts

    • LNB Tester

      LNB Tester

      Before you ask what an LNB tester is, you should know what an LNB is. An LNB is the receiving end of a satellite dish. LNB stands for low noise blocker; it is a device that essentially does what it says. It blocks low noise (frequencies) in order to receive higher frequencies in which satellite

    • QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying)

      QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying)

      QPSK (Quadrature Phase Shift Keying) is a phase modulation algorithm. Phase modulation is a frequency modulation version where the carrier wave’s phase is modulated to encode bits of digital information in each phase change. The “PSK” in QPSK refers to the use of Phased Shift Keying. Phased Shift Keying is a form of phase modulation

    • Rainfade

      Rainfade

      Rainfade refers to a phenomenon that occurs during strong rain or snowfall in which satellite signals are prevented from reaching their destination. Rainfade may also refer to extensive cloud cover, strong winds, or any other environmental effect that distorts a satellite broadcast, but is most often observed during rainfall. Rainfade may also refer to the

    • Shunt

      Shunt

      An electrical shunt is a component used to transfer currents away from parts of a circuit. Components used as shunts include the resistor, capacitor, diode, and gas discharge tube. The main uses for electrical shunts are to reduce current load in meters, filter out high frequencies, and protect circuits from surges. The term shunt is

    • Radio Repeater

      Radio Repeater

      Portable radios are limited in the power at which they can transmit, usually somewhere between .5 watts and 5 watts. A very rough rule of thumb is that one watt equals one mile of range over flat and open terrain. Buildings and mountains will, of course, greatly modify effective range. When two radios communicate directly

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