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    • Ka Band

      Ka Band

      The Ka band uplink uses frequencies between 27.5GHz and 31Ghz and the downlink uses frequencies between 18.3 and 18.8Ghz and between 19.7 and 20.2Ghz. The Ka band is branch of the K band from the electromagnetic spectrum. The term “Ka-band” is from Kurz-above, which originates from the German phrase “kurz” implying short. Ka band dishes

    • Uplink

      Uplink

      Uplink refers to a transmission of data in which data flows from a ground-based transmitter to an orbital satellite receiver. Uplink is used to send data to a satellite in Earth’s orbit in order to make changes to the way the satellite functions or simply redirect data to another ground-based receiver. Uplink is used in

    • LNB (Low Noise Block)

      LNB (Low Noise Block)

      An LNB (Low Noise Block aka LNC- Low Noise Converter) is used for communications (broadcast) satellite reception. The LNB is usually affixed either in or on the satellite dish. The LNB’s purpose is to utilize the super heterodyne effect and amplify and convert a wide block (band) of frequencies. This helps compensate the signal loss

    • Mobile Satellite Service

      Mobile Satellite Service

      Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) is a type of mobile telephone service that depends on portable terrestrial satellites rather than fixed terrestrial satellites that are also known as cell phone towers. Portable terrestrial satellites are similar to cell phone towers, but can be mounted on moving vehicles such as cars, ships, and airplanes, and individual users

    • What is Intersymbol Interference?

      What is Intersymbol Interference?

      Intersymbol interference is a signal distortion in telecommunication. One or more symbols can interfere with other symbols causing noise or a less reliable signal. The main causes of intersymbol interference are multipath propagation or non-linear frequency in channels. This has the effect of a blur or mixture of symbols, which can reduce signal clarity. If

    • L band

      L band

      L band is a fequency range between 390MHz and 1.55GHz which is used for satellite communications and for terrestrial communications between satellite equipment. The high frequencies utilized by C band, Ku band, and Ka band would suffer from high signal loss when transported over a copper coax cable such as an Intra-Facility Link. An LNB

    • What is a BUC?

      What is a BUC?

      A BUC (Block Upconverter) is a device that converts radio signals from a lower frequency to a higher frequency. BUCs are used in satellite uplink transmissions in order to transfer data from a ground based unit to a satellite in orbit that will then be redirected to another ground based unit in separate location. Likewise,

    • Spot Beam

      Spot Beam

      A spot beam is a beam of radio signals that is directed towards a specific area on the Earth’s surface. Spot beams are the opposite of broad beams, which are beams that are directed towards a large area of the Earth’s surface. While broad beams are used for general telecommunication and surveillance, spot beams are

    • IFL (Interfacility Link)

      IFL (Interfacility Link)

      An IFL, or Interfacility Link, is a cable system that is used in facilities to connect an outdoor unit and an indoor unit. An outdoor unit refers to the satellite receiver or coaxial cable that connects a service provider to a company while an indoor unit refers to the coaxial cables, routers, or transmitters inside

    • SCPC (Single Channel Per Carrier)

      SCPC (Single Channel Per Carrier)

      SCPC stands for Single Channel Per Carrier. SCPC is a form of satellite transmission where each channel is transmitted on a dedicated single carrier. The alternative to SCPC is MCPC (Multiple Channel Per Carrier). MCPC is more efficient than SCPC, but SCPC is still utilized for some satellite feeds. By using SCPC, satellite users are

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