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    • L band

      L band

      L band is a fequency range between 390MHz and 1.55GHz which is used for satellite communications and for terrestrial communications between satellite equipment. The high frequencies utilized by C band, Ku band, and Ka band would suffer from high signal loss when transported over a copper coax cable such as an Intra-Facility Link. An LNB

    • FSK (Frequency Shift Keying)

      FSK (Frequency Shift Keying)

      FSK (Frequency Shift Keying) is also known as frequency shift modulation and frequency shift signaling. Frequency Shift Keying is a data signal converted into a specific frequency or tone in order to transmit it over wire, cable, optical fiber or wireless media to a destination point. The history of FSK dates back to the early

    • Spot Beam

      Spot Beam

      A spot beam is a beam of radio signals that is directed towards a specific area on the Earth’s surface. Spot beams are the opposite of broad beams, which are beams that are directed towards a large area of the Earth’s surface. While broad beams are used for general telecommunication and surveillance, spot beams are

    • How Satellite Images Are Made

      How Satellite Images Are Made

      Satellite images are taken by reconnaissance satellites that orbit the Earth at a relatively low altitude, between 300 to 600 miles (or 480 to 970 km). As the majority of today's satellites are custom made in order to accommodate particular needs of the designer, there is no standard on which photo imagery is based on

    • Backward Error Correction (BEC)

      Backward Error Correction (BEC)

      Backward Error Correction, also known as an “Automatic Repeat Request” is an error correction technique in which a receiving device sends a request to the source device to re-send information. Backward Error Correction is used in situations where some of the transmitted data has been lost or corrupted during transit and the transmitting device must

    • Medium Earth Orbit

      Medium Earth Orbit

      Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) refers to a satellite which orbits the earth at an altitude below 22,300 miles (geostationary orbit) and above the altitude of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites. Medium Earth Orbit represents a series of tradeoffs between geostationary orbit (GEO) and Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Medium Earth Orbit enables a satellite provider to

    • TV-GPS Technology

      TV-GPS Technology

      TV-GPS is a technology from Rosum Corporation of California. Basically, it is a GPS tracking technology that makes use of television broadcasting signals to intensify or strengthen GPS signals. It is slated for use in urban areas where most people own a television (so the TV broadcasting signals are extremely strong) and where the regular

    • Uplink

      Uplink

      Uplink refers to a transmission of data in which data flows from a ground-based transmitter to an orbital satellite receiver. Uplink is used to send data to a satellite in Earth’s orbit in order to make changes to the way the satellite functions or simply redirect data to another ground-based receiver. Uplink is used in

    • Feedhorn

      Feedhorn

      The feedhorn is the part of a satellite dish system which gathers the reflected signal from the dish and focuses it towards the LNB. It is a type of horn antenna that is deployed to convey radio signals between the transceiver and the reflector antenna. Horn antennas basically effect a transition between waves propagating through

    • ODU (Out-Door Unit)

      ODU (Out-Door Unit)

      ODU (Out-Door Unit) refers to the set of satellite equipment which is placed outside of the building. The ODU typically includes a satellite dish, a feedhorn, and a LNB (Low Noise Block). In bi-directional satellite systems, the ODU will also include a BUC (Block Up Convertor). The ODU is connected to the IDU (In-Door-Unit) by

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