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    • VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal)

      VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal)

      VSAT (Very Small Aperture Terminal) is basically a two-way satellite ground station with a less than 3 meters tall (most of them are about 0.75 m to 1.2 m tall) dish antenna stationed. The transmission rates of VSATs are usually from very low up to 4 Mbit/s. These VSATs’ primary job is to access the

    • IDU (In-Door Unit)

      IDU (In-Door Unit)

      An IDU, or In-Door Unit, is a telecommunication device that is used in satellite television and Internet service to receive and decode satellite transmissions. An IDU is a box that connects to the user’s television and/or router and contains a built-in satellite receiver that may also be connected to a satellite dish on the roof

    • Fixed Satellite Service

      Fixed Satellite Service

      Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) is a type of mobile telephone service that allows users in a specific area to make and receive cell phone calls. FSS systems or cell phone towers are placed in strategic, fixed locations and provide service to thousands of individual users simultaneously. Generally, FSS systems provide reception for several square miles

    • How GPS Tracking Works

      How GPS Tracking Works

      GPS – A Short Introduction GPS, which stands for Global Positioning System, is a satellite navigation system that can ascertain the latitude and longitude of a GPS receiver device on the Earth.  The GPS consists of more than two dozen global positioning satellites orbiting the earth. Each satellite transmits radio signals, which can help determine

    • Downlink

      Downlink

      Downlink is a term in telecommunications that is used to refer to a data transmission in which data flows from an orbital satellite receiver to a ground-based transmitter. Downlink transmissions rely on the C Band between 3.7 and 4.2 GHz, the Ku Band between 11.7 and 12.7 GHz, and the Ka Band between 18.3 and

    • LNB (Low Noise Block)

      LNB (Low Noise Block)

      An LNB (Low Noise Block aka LNC- Low Noise Converter) is used for communications (broadcast) satellite reception. The LNB is usually affixed either in or on the satellite dish. The LNB’s purpose is to utilize the super heterodyne effect and amplify and convert a wide block (band) of frequencies. This helps compensate the signal loss

    • Symbol Rate

      Symbol Rate

      The symbol rate is the rate of state changes on a communications circuit. If a circuit can carry two tones per second, the circuit has a symbol rate of two. Circuits then use different modulation techniques to carry multiple bits per symbol. If the circuit is limited to two different tones, the first tone can

    • Ka Band

      Ka Band

      The Ka band uplink uses frequencies between 27.5GHz and 31Ghz and the downlink uses frequencies between 18.3 and 18.8Ghz and between 19.7 and 20.2Ghz. The Ka band is branch of the K band from the electromagnetic spectrum. The term “Ka-band” is from Kurz-above, which originates from the German phrase “kurz” implying short. Ka band dishes

    • IFL (Interfacility Link)

      IFL (Interfacility Link)

      An IFL, or Interfacility Link, is a cable system that is used in facilities to connect an outdoor unit and an indoor unit. An outdoor unit refers to the satellite receiver or coaxial cable that connects a service provider to a company while an indoor unit refers to the coaxial cables, routers, or transmitters inside

    • Spot Beam

      Spot Beam

      A spot beam is a beam of radio signals that is directed towards a specific area on the Earth’s surface. Spot beams are the opposite of broad beams, which are beams that are directed towards a large area of the Earth’s surface. While broad beams are used for general telecommunication and surveillance, spot beams are

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