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    • SVGA (Super Video Graphics Array)

      SVGA (Super Video Graphics Array)

      SVGA is an acronym for Super Video Graphics Array and covers a wide range of computer display standards used in the manufacture of computer monitors and screens. The SVGA standard was designed by VESA, the Video Electronics Standards Association. When using SVGA as a direct comparison to other display standards such as XGA (Extended Graphics

    • Lightning Arrester

      Lightning Arrester

      A lightning/surge arrester is a device that protects structures from electrical damage by intercepting lightning surges and diverting them to the ground. Lightning arresters are connected directly to the ground via low resistance cables, although they are generally mounted on high buildings or other structures in order to attract electricity. They can be used on

    • High Definition Audio

      High Definition Audio

      High Definition Audio, also known as HD Audio, is an audio standard created by Intel to be used on their chipsets, i.e. it is a standard for high-quality on-board audio. HD Audio was designed to replace the Audio Codec 97 (AC'97) standard that Intel released in 1997. The main achievement of the AC'97 specification was

    • Computer Privacy Screen

      Computer Privacy Screen

      Computer privacy screens, sometimes called computer privacy filters offers added security by making any image on the screen visible only to the computer user sitting directly in front of the image. Other angles that are not in direct view of the screen are distorted or blacked out completely. Types of Computer Privacy Screens There are

    • Random Access Memory

      Random Access Memory

      Random-access memory is a type of data storage for computers. Commonly known as the acronym RAM or simply memory, random-access memory details the speed in which data that is stored can be accessed at random. This means that the strength of the RAM determines, at random, how fast a piece of data can be pulled

    • L1 Cache

      L1 Cache

      The L1 cache refers to the first tier in a computer processor’s memory cache system that increases the speed at which the processor delivers results to the user. The L1 cache sits between the processor and the computer’s RAM (Random Access Memory) and stores the user’s most accessed data in order for the processor to

    • How to Monitor CPU Temperature

      How to Monitor CPU Temperature

      Excessive heat damages electronics. Monitoring CPU and other computer components’ temperature help them run properly. To make the most of monitoring software, users must ensure that ACPI functionality is enabled in their motherboard BIOS. Why CPU Temperature is so Important When the first affordable PCs were offered to the general public in the early 80’s,

    • Pentium

      Pentium

      The Pentium family of processors is the current generation of CPU's for personal computers from Intel. Pentium processors trace their heritage all the way back to the original Intel 8088 CPU used in the original IBM-PC in 1981. Intel renamed the 80586 processor Pentium because of the difficulties of trademarking numbers. This was a move

    • How to Mount an ISO

      How to Mount an ISO

      An ISO file is an image that contains all the data files and file system metadata (i.e. boot code, structures, and attributes) of a CD/DVD. In order to mount an ISO image, a disk image emulator that will allow the content of a CD/DVD to be read from an ISO image via a virtual drive

    • EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory)

      EEPROM (Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory)

      EEPROM stands for Electrically Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory. An EEPROM is like an EPROM chip since it can be written in or programmed more than once. Unlike the EPROM chip, however, an EEPROM chip need not be taken out of the computer or electronic device of which it is part when a new program or

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