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  • Network Layer

    • DHCP Scope

      DHCP Scope

      A DHCP scope is a valid range of IP addresses that are available for assignment or lease to client computers on a particular subnet. In a DHCP server, a scope is configured to determine the address pool of IPs that the server can provide to DHCP clients. Scopes determine which IP addresses are provided to

    • What is NetBEUI?

      What is NetBEUI?

      NetBEUI (NetBIOS Extended User Interface) is an extended version of NetBIOS, the primary software that allows individual computers to communicate within a given local area network. While NetBIOS itself is most often used to transfer pictures, documents, videos, or other files from one computer to another, NetBEUI is responsible for arranging the actual information in

    • Broadcast Domain

      Broadcast Domain

      A broadcast domain is a logical part of a network (a network segment) in which any network equipment can transmit data directly to other equipment or device without going through a routing device (assuming the devices share the same subnet and use the same gateway; also, they must be in the same VLAN). A more

    • Frame vs Packet

      Frame vs Packet

      A packet and a frame are both packages of data moving through a network. A packet exists at Layer 3 of the OSI Model, whereas a frame exists at Layer 2 of the OSI Model. Layer 2 is the Data Link Layer. The best known Data Link Layer protocol is Ethernet. Layer 3 is the

    • 192.168.1.1 – What Are its Uses and Why is it Important?

      192.168.1.1 – What Are its Uses and Why is it Important?

      The 192.168.1.1 IP address is a default commonly used by Linksys routers. Linksys is now a division of Cisco, Incorporated and makes a large number of the broadband routers used throughout the world. The address is not exclusive to Linksys, but most other major router manufacturers use different default addresses for configuration of home or

    • IP Address Classes

      IP Address Classes

      IP Address classes were the original organizational structure for IP addresses. The specific address class would determine the maximum potential size for a computer network. The address class would define which of the specific bits of the address would be used to identify the network and network identification, the bits to identify the host computer

    • What is PCAP?

      What is PCAP?

      PCAP (Packet Capture) is a protocol for wireless Internet communication that allows a computer or device to receive incoming radio signals from another device and convert those signals into usable information. It allows a wireless device to convert information into radio signals in order to transfer them to another device. PCAP runs in the background

    • 802.1Q

      802.1Q

      802.1Q is also known as IEEE 802.1Q or VLAN tagging. It defines a virtual local area network. It is a protocol that allows virtual LANs to communicate with one another using a 3-layered router. It was developed as a part of IEEE 802. Why Was The 802.1Q Standard Developed? Large networks use up a lot

    • IP (Internet Protocol)

      IP (Internet Protocol)

      The primary network communications protocol used on networks today is the IP (Internet Protocol). IP relays or transfers network packets, also known as datagrams, to destinations on local networks or across the public Internet. It defines the structures which encapsulate information as well as the legal addressing methods used to identify the source and destination

    • DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)

      DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol)

      An IP address can be defined as a unique numeric identifier (address) that is assigned to each computer operating in a TCP/IP based network. Manually configuring computers with IP addresses and other TCP/IP configuration parameters is not an intricate task. However, manually configuring thousands of workstations with unique IP addresses would be a time consuming,

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