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    • Ham Radio Software

      Ham Radio Software

      Ham Radio Software, also known as Amateur Radio Software, refers to computer programs designed exclusively for ham radio equipment. Once thought to be a means of communication between radio enthusiasts, ham radio now coexists with software including data and contest loggers, log books, Morse code tutors, and antenna design aids. In the 21st century there

    • How Bug Detectors Work

      How Bug Detectors Work

      A bug detector is a device that is able to locate and/or disable electronic spy equipment such as microphones, cameras, and GPS tracking devices. Law enforcement agencies, military counter-intelligence agencies, criminals, and everyday individuals who are suspicious of being overheard often use bug detectors. Bug detectors are usually small, portable, and have multiple display functions

    • Baseband

      Baseband

      Generally, a transmission signal contains more than a single frequency. This is to say that there might be several different frequencies linked together or else superimposed on each other. This is just the way all telecommunication systems function. For example, with today's communication technology it is virtually impossible to send low frequencies without experiencing any

    • How XM Radio Works

      How XM Radio Works

      XM radio is one of the two primary satellite radio services in North America. The service is operated by Sirius XM Radio and publishes premium radio content in addition to more than 70 music channels, 39 news, ports, talk, and entertainment choices, 23 play-by-play sports channels, and 21 regional and weather channels. XM radio channels

    • What is VSWR?

      What is VSWR?

      VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) is a metric commonly used with antenna systems for ham or shortwave radio communication. VSWR is normally defined as a ratio with a 1:1 VSWR, indicating that there is an exact or perfect match between all antenna system elements. The VSWR can also be expressed by comparing Vmax with Vmin

    • The SMA Connector

      The SMA Connector

      The SMA (SubMiniature Type A) connector is a type of the radio frequency connector developed in the 1960s to make it easier to connect coaxial cables. Using a screw-type design instead of the common ‘push-pull’ system, the SMA connector allows for a quick connection; and can be used in both alternating and direct current applications.

    • Radio Repeater

      Radio Repeater

      Portable radios are limited in the power at which they can transmit, usually somewhere between .5 watts and 5 watts. A very rough rule of thumb is that one watt equals one mile of range over flat and open terrain. Buildings and mountains will, of course, greatly modify effective range. When two radios communicate directly

    • Spark-Gap Transmitter

      Spark-Gap Transmitter

      A spark-gap transmitter is a mechanism for producing radio signals. It has been the primary radio transmission device during the early years of radio technology. It was soon superseded by other transmitters due to its discontinuous radio wave production and widely varying frequencies. How a Spark-Grap Transmitter Works A spark gap transmitter is basically composed

    • BNC Connector

      BNC Connector

      More properly known as the Bayonet Neill-Concelman connector, the BNC connector is one of several radio frequency connectors on the market today. The name of the connector is derived from a combination of two things: 1) the connecting technology employed; and 2) the names of the two inventors of the device. Paul Neill of Bell

    • MS Connectors

      MS Connectors

      MIL-C-5015, now known popularly as MS connectors, are multi-pin, highly durable connectors that were originally invented for use in military applications. They have a variety of features that makes them easy to use for nearly any application and are often found in a variety of advanced, high power, heavy duty devices in the industrial world.

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