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    • Linux

      Linux

      Linux is a free, open source operating system that competes with the Windows Operating Systems and Mac OS X. Linux is widely used on a number of devices such as servers, desktops, laptops, smartphones, PDAs, game consoles, tablet computers, supercomputers, and mainframes. Linux controls only about 4.9% of the market share of desktop computers while

    • How to Change a Unix Password

      How to Change a Unix Password

      To change your Unix password, use the `passwd` command. ¬†Unless you are the “root” user, you will need to know your current password to set a new one. ¬†If you have forgotten your current password, you will need to contact the “root” user to have your password reset. Here is an example of the user

    • How to Use the Grep Command

      How to Use the Grep Command

      The grep command is a search command built into a variety of Unix based operating systems. This command line utility, whose name stems from the original Unix term which means “search globally for lines matching the regular expression, and print them,” can be accessed using the command line or terminal from anywhere in the Unix

    • How to Backup Unix

      How to Backup Unix

      Most Unix systems come with several basic backup software options, including dd, cpio, tar, and dump. If the basic backup software included with Unix does not meet your needs, you may want to look at some of the more comprehensive software packages designed to backup Unix and Windows systems. Built-in Unix Backup Software tar tar

    • How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      One of the best methods to capture a Unix terminal session is to use the `script` command. In this example we start a script session, run a couple of commands, and then use the `exit` command to stop capturing the terminal session: $ script Script started, output file is typescript $ pwd /home/will $ ps

    • What is Tar?

      What is Tar?

      Tar refers to a tape archiving file format and the program that creates them. Tar stands for tape archive. It combines multiple files together so that they can be used for programs, applications, and critical system files. While Tar does not directly install files to a user’s hard drive, it is responsible for compiling the

    • Bootable Linux Distributions

      Bootable Linux Distributions

      Bootable distributions of the Linux operating system are becoming very popular for use in securing networks, testing network security, and conducting forensics after suspected intrusions. Local Area Security Linux Local Area Security Linux is a ‘Live CD’ distribution with a small footprint. Containing over 200 information security and administration related tools, as well as a

    • Restricted Shells

      Restricted Shells

      A restricted shell is a Unix shell that has been modified to allow the Unix shell user to do fewer things than a normal shell would allow him to do. It may allow the user to run only certain programs. It may stop the user from changing directories. Many sites run their own restricted shells

    • UMASK

      UMASK

      umask is a Unix shell built-in command that automatically sets file permissions on newly created files. The umask command can be confusing to use because it does work as a mask. In other words, the user sets the permissions that he/she does not want in the umask. To calculate permissions that will result from specific

    • How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      To change an IP address on a Solaris system immediately, use the `ifconfig` command. The syntax for `ifconfig` is: ifconfig <interface> <ip address> <netmask> <broadcast address> If the user does not know his/her network interface names, he/she should use the `ifconfig -a` command to list all of the available network interfaces. Permanently Change an IP

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