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    • Unix Shell Scripting Tutorials

      Unix Shell Scripting Tutorials

      Unix Shell Scripting Tutorials This Unix shell scripting tutorial provides samples and instructional materials that are easy to understand and useful for Unix shell scripting. It also offers illustrated samples that will helps users explore different avenues of Unix shell scripting.   Bourne Shell Programming Tutorial Learn how to use the Unix shell with this

    • Linux

      Linux

      Linux is a free, open source operating system that competes with the Windows Operating Systems and Mac OS X. Linux is widely used on a number of devices such as servers, desktops, laptops, smartphones, PDAs, game consoles, tablet computers, supercomputers, and mainframes. Linux controls only about 4.9% of the market share of desktop computers while

    • How to Copy UNIX Files to Windows

      How to Copy UNIX Files to Windows

      For those computer users that have both Unix and Window’s operating systems, you should know that you can easily copy your Unix files from a Unix computer and transfer them to a Windows computer. Using Client for NFS, you can transfer any existing Unix files from your Unix server to a Windows based server. It

    • How to Change a Hostname on Solaris

      How to Change a Hostname on Solaris

      Solaris makes it unreasonably difficult to change an installed server’s hostname. To change the hostname on a Solaris system, edit all of these files: /etc/hosts /etc/nodename /etc/hostname.* /etc/inet/ipnodes When file editing is complete, reboot the server to test the changes and ensure that they operate correctly. Note that changing the hostname only changes the name

    • How to Create a Cron Job

      How to Create a Cron Job

      Unix users write, edit, list, and remove cron jobs using the `crontab` command. `crontab -e` takes users into their default editor to edit their crontab entries. `crontab -l` lists their crontab. `crontab -r` removes their crontab. crontab Security If the cron.allow file exists, then the user must be listed in that file in order to

    • Linux Restricted Shell

      Linux Restricted Shell

      The idea of a restricted shell first arose in the Unix operating system in order to prevent the end-user from doing as many operations as a normal shell allows. A restricted shell lets the administrator control the end-user’s computing environment by only permitting explicitly used commands to be used. The Linux restricted shell (rssh) is

    • The History of UNIX

      The History of UNIX

      UNIX is one of the most important operating systems ever developed. What made Unix stand out in the crowd of countless other operating systems is that it was a competent operating system that was extremely affordable and worked on low cost hardware. Economics definitely played a large part in UNIX’s popularity and today it is

    • Rootkit

      Rootkit

      A rootkit is a type of computer malware that is created to hide programs or other computer processes from detection from both users and antivirus software programs. Once installed, a rootkit will typically obtain administrator or higher-level permissions on the infected computer. Although rootkits originated with the UNIX operating system by providing root access to

    • Unix Signals

      Unix Signals

      A signal is a message that can be sent to a running process. Programs, users, or administrators can initiate signals. For example, the proper method of telling the Internet Daemon (inetd) to re-read its configuration file is to send it a SIGHUP signal. For example, if the current process ID (PID) of inetd is 4140,

    • How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      One of the best methods to capture a Unix terminal session is to use the `script` command. In this example we start a script session, run a couple of commands, and then use the `exit` command to stop capturing the terminal session: $ script Script started, output file is typescript $ pwd /home/will $ ps

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