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    • How to Find Out CPU Utilization in UNIX

      How to Find Out CPU Utilization in UNIX

      Keeping track of your CPU’s performance is extremely important. In UNIX, you can accomplish this task by using the system utilities and commands. For those who would like to find out their CPU utilization, one command is extremely important. It is called SAR – System Activity Reporter. The SAR commands make accessing CPU performance quite

    • Unix File Permissions

      Unix File Permissions

      Unix file permissions are based upon an octal code. Unix file permissions are stored in a ten character array. The first character of the file permissions stores the file type. The standard file types are: Character Meaning – Plain file d Directory c Character device b Block device l Symbolic link s Socket = or

    • Linux

      Linux

      Linux is a free, open source operating system that competes with the Windows Operating Systems and Mac OS X. Linux is widely used on a number of devices such as servers, desktops, laptops, smartphones, PDAs, game consoles, tablet computers, supercomputers, and mainframes. Linux controls only about 4.9% of the market share of desktop computers while

    • Configuring a Linux DHCP Server

      Configuring a Linux DHCP Server

      DHCP is the dynamic host configuration protocol. In other words, it describes how your computer is connected to networks. Assigning an IP address dynamically is a basic task assigned to DHCP along with domain name, name server, gateway, host name and net mask. DHCP can provide other information like time server and has a capability

    • How to Use the Unix Sort Command

      How to Use the Unix Sort Command

      The Unix sort command is a command for the Unix family of operating systems. It is designed to sort whatever information you give it. The command can be used for a variety of purposes, but it is most frequently employed when there are a number of different files which need to be ordered in some

    • Rootkit

      Rootkit

      A rootkit is a type of computer malware that is created to hide programs or other computer processes from detection from both users and antivirus software programs. Once installed, a rootkit will typically obtain administrator or higher-level permissions on the infected computer. Although rootkits originated with the UNIX operating system by providing root access to

    • How to Use the Grep Command

      How to Use the Grep Command

      The grep command is a search command built into a variety of Unix based operating systems. This command line utility, whose name stems from the original Unix term which means “search globally for lines matching the regular expression, and print them,” can be accessed using the command line or terminal from anywhere in the Unix

    • How to Backup Unix

      How to Backup Unix

      Most Unix systems come with several basic backup software options, including dd, cpio, tar, and dump. If the basic backup software included with Unix does not meet your needs, you may want to look at some of the more comprehensive software packages designed to backup Unix and Windows systems. Built-in Unix Backup Software tar tar

    • Restricted Shells

      Restricted Shells

      A restricted shell is a Unix shell that has been modified to allow the Unix shell user to do fewer things than a normal shell would allow him to do. It may allow the user to run only certain programs. It may stop the user from changing directories. Many sites run their own restricted shells

    • How to Change a Hostname on Solaris

      How to Change a Hostname on Solaris

      Solaris makes it unreasonably difficult to change an installed server’s hostname. To change the hostname on a Solaris system, edit all of these files: /etc/hosts /etc/nodename /etc/hostname.* /etc/inet/ipnodes When file editing is complete, reboot the server to test the changes and ensure that they operate correctly. Note that changing the hostname only changes the name

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