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    • How to Use the Unix Find Command

      How to Use the Unix Find Command

      The Unix find command, as the name implies, is a command that you can enter into the command line, or terminal, of a Unix operating system, allowing you to process any given set of files or directories. It is a highly useful command that you can take advantage of on Unix based operating system, making

    • Unix Shell Scripting Tutorials

      Unix Shell Scripting Tutorials

      Unix Shell Scripting Tutorials This Unix shell scripting tutorial provides samples and instructional materials that are easy to understand and useful for Unix shell scripting. It also offers illustrated samples that will helps users explore different avenues of Unix shell scripting.   Bourne Shell Programming Tutorial Learn how to use the Unix shell with this

    • Configuring a Linux DHCP Server

      Configuring a Linux DHCP Server

      DHCP is the dynamic host configuration protocol. In other words, it describes how your computer is connected to networks. Assigning an IP address dynamically is a basic task assigned to DHCP along with domain name, name server, gateway, host name and net mask. DHCP can provide other information like time server and has a capability

    • How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      One of the best methods to capture a Unix terminal session is to use the `script` command. In this example we start a script session, run a couple of commands, and then use the `exit` command to stop capturing the terminal session: $ script Script started, output file is typescript $ pwd /home/will $ ps

    • The History of UNIX

      The History of UNIX

      UNIX is one of the most important operating systems ever developed. What made Unix stand out in the crowd of countless other operating systems is that it was a competent operating system that was extremely affordable and worked on low cost hardware. Economics definitely played a large part in UNIX’s popularity and today it is

    • How to Kill a Process in Unix

      How to Kill a Process in Unix

      A computer process is a computer program that is executing and has a unique process identification or PID. On the Unix Operating System (OS), a process may be running in the background, foreground, or be in a suspended state. On Unix, the OS shell will not return the prompt to the end-user until the current

    • How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      To change an IP address on a Solaris system immediately, use the `ifconfig` command. The syntax for `ifconfig` is: ifconfig <interface> <ip address> <netmask> <broadcast address> If the user does not know his/her network interface names, he/she should use the `ifconfig -a` command to list all of the available network interfaces. Permanently Change an IP

    • How to Find Out CPU Utilization in UNIX

      How to Find Out CPU Utilization in UNIX

      Keeping track of your CPU’s performance is extremely important. In UNIX, you can accomplish this task by using the system utilities and commands. For those who would like to find out their CPU utilization, one command is extremely important. It is called SAR – System Activity Reporter. The SAR commands make accessing CPU performance quite

    • How to Backup Unix

      How to Backup Unix

      Most Unix systems come with several basic backup software options, including dd, cpio, tar, and dump. If the basic backup software included with Unix does not meet your needs, you may want to look at some of the more comprehensive software packages designed to backup Unix and Windows systems. Built-in Unix Backup Software tar tar

    • How to Use the Grep Command

      How to Use the Grep Command

      The grep command is a search command built into a variety of Unix based operating systems. This command line utility, whose name stems from the original Unix term which means “search globally for lines matching the regular expression, and print them,” can be accessed using the command line or terminal from anywhere in the Unix

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