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    • How Firewall Protection Works

      How Firewall Protection Works

      Firewall protection works by blocking certain types of traffic between a source and a destination. All network traffic has a source, a destination, and a protocol. This protocol is usually TCP, UDP, or ICMP. If this protocol is TCP or UDP, there is a source port and a destination port. Most often the source port

    • 802.11a

      802.11a

      802.11a is one of the many standards used for high speed wireless networks, usually referred to as Wifi. This standard was created by the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) in 1999 and uses several different frequencies including 5.15-5.35/5.47-5.725/5.725-5.875 GHz to send and receive data from one electronic or computer device to another. There

    • Packet Fragmentation

      Packet Fragmentation

      Every packet based network has an MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) size. The MTU is the size of the largest packet that that network can transmit. Packets larger than the allowable MTU must be divided into smaller packets or fragments to enable them to traverse the network. Network Standard MTU Ethernet 1500 Token Ring 4096 Packet

    • DSL (Digital Subscriber Line)

      DSL (Digital Subscriber Line)

      Digital Subscriber Line or Digital Subscriber Loop (DSL) is a type of high-speed Internet technology that enables transmission of digital data via the wires of a telephone network. DSL does not interfere with the telephone line; the same line can be used for both Internet and regular telephone services. The download speed of DSL ranges

    • File Sharing

      File Sharing

      A common practice in modern society is the use of file sharing programs and applications. These file sharing programs have been shrouded in controversy, scrutiny, and criticism since their inceptions. Despite that, however, file sharing programs are used by millions of people worldwide on a daily basis and that number is only growing. This article

    • Proxy ARP

      Proxy ARP

      ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is used by network systems to convert system communications from the routable layer 3 IP protocol to the non-routable layer 2 data link layer protocols. In most cases, you don’t need to modify this behavior at all, and system communications are optimal. In special circumstances it is preferable to have another

    • Presentation Layer

      Presentation Layer

      The presentation layer is one of seven layers of the OSI (Open Systems Interconnections) Model and is found between the application layer and the session layer. The presentation layer is commonly used for encryption and decryption as well as the conversion of file formats. The presentation layer is considered the last layer in which data

    • 192.168

      192.168

      The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) has allocated three IP address ranges that are to be exclusively used for private Internet networks: 10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix) 172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix) 192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix) The first block “10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255” is referred to as the 24-bit block, the second “172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255”

    • DHCP Reservation

      DHCP Reservation

      A DHCP reservation is a permanent IP address assignment. It is a specific IP address within a DHCP scope that is permanently reserved for leased use to a specific DHCP client. Users can configure a DHCP reservation in their DHCP server when they need to reserve a permanent IP address assignment. Reservations are used for

    • 568B

      568B

      568B, or more formally EIA/TIA 568B, is one of the International standards which include the definition for how the pins or wires in a RJ-45 cable are arranged or terminated. The termination of the cable can occur at several locations which include an individual cable connecting a computer to an Ethernet port, the ending socket

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