• Main Menu
  • Networking

    • How to Reset a Netgear Router

      How to Reset a Netgear Router

      Netgear routers are some of the most popular routers in the world, providing both residential and commercial users with wireless networks that are accessible from a wide variety of mobile devices such as laptops, tablets, smartphones, and even desktop computers that are outfitted with a wireless adapter (which Netgear also sells). Netgear routers are available

    • WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy)

      WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy)

      Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) is the encryption algorithm built into the 802.11 (Wi-Fi) standard. WEP encryption uses the RC4 stream cipher with 40 or 104 bit keys and a 24 bit initialization vector. WEP Key Generation Most 802.11 devices allow WEP keys to be entered using an ASCII passphrase or in hexidecimal format. The conversion

    • CDMA-2000 1xRTT

      CDMA-2000 1xRTT

      CDMA-2000 1xRTT is a 3G wireless technology based on the CDMA platform. The 1x in 1xRTT refers to 1x the number of 1.25MHz channels. The RTT in 1xRTT stands for Radio Transmission Technology. The CDMA-2000 1xRTT protocol was developed by Qualcomm. CDMA-2000 1xRTT is a CDMA version of the IMT-2000 standard which was developed by

    • Public DNS Servers

      Public DNS Servers

      DNS (Domain Name System) servers are designed to allow networked devices such as computers, phones, and other servers to look up address records in DNS tables. The majority of DNS servers are configured to provide service to the organizations or people that own or pay service fees for the hardware. There are a number of

    • BOOTP

      BOOTP

      BOOTP is the Bootstrap Protocol. The BOOTP protocol is utilized by diskless workstations to gather configuration information from a network server. The information provided by the BOOTP protocol is: The IP address which should be utilized by the diskless workstation The IP address of a server which will provide an Operating System image for the

    • TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol)

      TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol)

      TKIP (Temporal Key Integrity Protocol) is part of a draft standard from the IEEE 802.11i working group. TKIP utilizes the RC4 stream cipher with 128-bit keys for encryption and 64-bit keys for authentication. TKIP is an enhancement to WEP (Wired Equivalent Privacy) security. TKIP enhances WEP by adding a per-packet key mixing function to de-correlate

    • Cat 3

      Cat 3

      Cat 3, short for Category 3, is a UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) cable designed to carry voice and data up to 10 Mbps (mega bits per second), with possible transmission frequencies up to 16 MHz. Cat 3 cable is part of a family of copper cabling standards defined jointly by the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA)

    • 127.0.0.1 – What Are its Uses and Why is it Important?

      127.0.0.1 – What Are its Uses and Why is it Important?

      127.0.0.1 is the loopback Internet protocol (IP) address also referred to as the “localhost.” The address is used to establish an IP connection to the same machine or computer being used by the end-user. The same convention is defined for computer’s that support IPv6 addressing using the connotation of ::1. Establishing a connection using the

    • 802.1Q

      802.1Q

      802.1Q is also known as IEEE 802.1Q or VLAN tagging. It defines a virtual local area network. It is a protocol that allows virtual LANs to communicate with one another using a 3-layered router. It was developed as a part of IEEE 802. Why Was The 802.1Q Standard Developed? Large networks use up a lot

    • RADIUS Server

      RADIUS Server

      RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service) is a system procedure that offers centralized entrance, approval, as well as accounting administration for individuals or computers to add and utilize a network service. Individuals often need “Authentication” when they try to fix to a network. People have to face far more problems while connecting their computers

    126 queries in 0.412 seconds.