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    • Collision Domain

      Collision Domain

      A computer network can be segmented physically and logically. A collision domain is one of the logical network segments in which the data packets can collide with each other. One of the most common protocols used when referring to a collision domain is the Ethernet protocol. Collision domains are often referred to as ‘Ethernet segments.’

    • What is ZigBee?

      What is ZigBee?

      ZigBee is a wireless protocol that was developed as an International standard to enable wireless, machine to machine communication, and networks. It is considered the catalyst for constructing “Smart” enabled buildings and homes since it is based on reliable network communications, a pro-longed battery life, and can be simply operated. The ZigBee Alliance is the

    • Packet Sniffers

      Packet Sniffers

      Packet sniffing is listening (with software) to the raw network device for interesting packets. When the software sees a packet that fits certain criteria, it logs it to a file. The most common criterion for an interesting packet is one that contains words like “login” or “password.” To packet sniff, obtain or code a packet

    • MIC (Message Integrity Check)

      MIC (Message Integrity Check)

      A message integrity check (MIC), is a security improvement for WEP encryption found on wireless networks. The check helps network administrators avoid attacks that focus on using the bit-flip technique on encrypted network data packets. Unlike the older ICV (Integrity Check Value) method, MIC is able to protect both the data payload and header of

    • How to Use PuTTY

      How to Use PuTTY

      PuTTY is an open source terminal emulation program that accesses Telnet, SSH, and other TCP protocols and acts as a serial client for computers. The letters “TTY” in the name PuTTY represent the terminal application in the Unix and Linux Operating Systems (OSs) and is also short for teletype. The PuTTY application was first written

    • Ethernet

      Ethernet

      Ethernet is the most common LAN (Local Area Network) technology in use today. Xerox developed Ethernet in the 1970s, and became popular after Digital Equipment Corporation and Intel joined Xerox in developing the Ethernet standard in 1980. Ethernet was officially accepted as IEEE standard 802.3 in 1985. The term “Ethernet” is now used to refer

    • Public DNS Servers

      Public DNS Servers

      DNS (Domain Name System) servers are designed to allow networked devices such as computers, phones, and other servers to look up address records in DNS tables. The majority of DNS servers are configured to provide service to the organizations or people that own or pay service fees for the hardware. There are a number of

    • BOOTP

      BOOTP

      BOOTP is the Bootstrap Protocol. The BOOTP protocol is utilized by diskless workstations to gather configuration information from a network server. The information provided by the BOOTP protocol is: The IP address which should be utilized by the diskless workstation The IP address of a server which will provide an Operating System image for the

    • Cat 3

      Cat 3

      Cat 3, short for Category 3, is a UTP (Unshielded Twisted Pair) cable designed to carry voice and data up to 10 Mbps (mega bits per second), with possible transmission frequencies up to 16 MHz. Cat 3 cable is part of a family of copper cabling standards defined jointly by the Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA)

    • 802.1Q

      802.1Q

      802.1Q is also known as IEEE 802.1Q or VLAN tagging. It defines a virtual local area network. It is a protocol that allows virtual LANs to communicate with one another using a 3-layered router. It was developed as a part of IEEE 802. Why Was The 802.1Q Standard Developed? Large networks use up a lot

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