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    • How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      To change an IP address on a Solaris system immediately, use the `ifconfig` command. The syntax for `ifconfig` is: ifconfig <interface> <ip address> <netmask> <broadcast address> If the user does not know his/her network interface names, he/she should use the `ifconfig -a` command to list all of the available network interfaces. Permanently Change an IP

    • Unix File Permissions

      Unix File Permissions

      Unix file permissions are based upon an octal code. Unix file permissions are stored in a ten character array. The first character of the file permissions stores the file type. The standard file types are: Character Meaning – Plain file d Directory c Character device b Block device l Symbolic link s Socket = or

    • How to Change a Hostname on Solaris

      How to Change a Hostname on Solaris

      Solaris makes it unreasonably difficult to change an installed server’s hostname. To change the hostname on a Solaris system, edit all of these files: /etc/hosts /etc/nodename /etc/hostname.* /etc/inet/ipnodes When file editing is complete, reboot the server to test the changes and ensure that they operate correctly. Note that changing the hostname only changes the name

    • How to Change a Unix Password

      How to Change a Unix Password

      To change your Unix password, use the `passwd` command. ¬†Unless you are the “root” user, you will need to know your current password to set a new one. ¬†If you have forgotten your current password, you will need to contact the “root” user to have your password reset. Here is an example of the user

    • Linux Restricted Shell

      Linux Restricted Shell

      The idea of a restricted shell first arose in the Unix operating system in order to prevent the end-user from doing as many operations as a normal shell allows. A restricted shell lets the administrator control the end-user’s computing environment by only permitting explicitly used commands to be used. The Linux restricted shell (rssh) is

    • How to Kill a Process in Unix

      How to Kill a Process in Unix

      A computer process is a computer program that is executing and has a unique process identification or PID. On the Unix Operating System (OS), a process may be running in the background, foreground, or be in a suspended state. On Unix, the OS shell will not return the prompt to the end-user until the current

    • Where to Get a Unix Emulator

      Where to Get a Unix Emulator

      It is very useful to have a Unix emulator installed on your machine to serve as a tool for learning how to use Unix and getting used to its environment. Once you are familiar, you can go ahead and install a full version of Unix. The best Unix emulator for your needs is Cygwin (pronounced

    • How to Setup a Linux File Server

      How to Setup a Linux File Server

      One way that a small business that requires a file server can save thousands of dollars per year is to set up a Linux file server. Linux is an open source software platform that, in many ways, is just as good as or better than other types of platforms including Microsoft and Sun. Small businesses

    • Configuring a Linux DHCP Server

      Configuring a Linux DHCP Server

      DHCP is the dynamic host configuration protocol. In other words, it describes how your computer is connected to networks. Assigning an IP address dynamically is a basic task assigned to DHCP along with domain name, name server, gateway, host name and net mask. DHCP can provide other information like time server and has a capability

    • How to Copy UNIX Files to Windows

      How to Copy UNIX Files to Windows

      For those computer users that have both Unix and Window’s operating systems, you should know that you can easily copy your Unix files from a Unix computer and transfer them to a Windows computer. Using Client for NFS, you can transfer any existing Unix files from your Unix server to a Windows based server. It

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