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    An MTRJ connector is a type of fiber optic cable that has an endpoint similar to the RJ-45 connector endpoint found in Ethernet connections. MTRJ connectors are designed to snap into the Ethernet port of a computer, modem, or wireless router and provide that computer or network with extremely fast data transfer rates. MTRJ connectors are usually designed for multi-mode optical fibers but can be used for single mode optical fibers as well. MTRJ connectors are approximately 2.45 mm x 4.4 mm in size and are standardized by the International Electrotechnical Commission.

     

    How MTRJ Connectors Work

    MTRJ connectors work in the same way that any fiber optic cable does, with modes of light travelling parallel with the fiber and their photons vibrating perpendicularly to the fiber. At its end, each MTRJ connector has an RJ-45-like endpoint that is slightly larger than a telephone jack and can fit into the Ethernet port on any computer, modem, or wireless router.

     

    Applications

    MTRJ connectors are used to provide fiber optic speeds to personal computers, servers, commercial workstations, wireless routers, modems, and other devices that have not already been equipped for use with fiber optic cables. MTRJ connectors are, therefore, a type of hybrid connector between a fiber optic cable and an Ethernet cable.

     

    Advantages

    MTRJ connectors are advantageous because they allow users to take advantage of fiber optic data transfer speeds without purchasing any special equipment or installing specially designed fiber optic systems. MTRJ connectors are fairly inexpensive and can be connected to any Ethernet-enabled hardware in the same way that an Ethernet cable can be.

     

    MTRJ Connector

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    3 comments
    1. AlmostThere

      2 April, 2013 at 9:42 pm

      The information makes it sound like you can use MTRJ in place of RJ45 Ethernet; however this is not the case. Fiber optic interfaces are still needed, only the size of the connector is similar to a copper-based Registered Jack (RJ) (MT being Mechanical Transfer).

      Reply
    2. AMMY

      4 August, 2011 at 10:21 am

      How to find the manufacturers licensed for MT-RJ?

      Reply
    3. AMMY

      4 August, 2011 at 10:19 am

      How to find the manufacturers licensed?

      Reply
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