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    • How Do I Align a DirecTV Satellite Dish?

      How Do I Align a DirecTV Satellite Dish?

      A DirecTV satellite dish may need realignment when strong winds, accidental movement, and various other situations occur. It may also become necessary to set up a dish that has come loose or one that was purchased without an installation plan. Whatever the case, individuals can alight the DirecTV dish on their own. Checking the Signal

    • The Best Satellite Dish

      The Best Satellite Dish

      There is no “one” best satellite dish. The best satellite dish for you depends upon several factors. Satellite Dish Size The larger the satellite dish, the better it will receive signals. Therefore, the largest satellite dish available is always the best satellite dish — except that few of us want a nine foot satellite dish

    • Dish 300

      Dish 300

      Dish 300 was the first satellite dish receiver provided by the direct broadcast satellite television company, Dish Network, and was originally known as the “Dish Network Dish”. Dish 300 had a single LNB, or Low Noise Block, that was capable of receiving signals from the 119°W orbital location owned by EchoStar as well as the

    • DirecTV Slimline Dish

      DirecTV Slimline Dish

      The DirecTV Slimline Dish is a relatively recent addition to DirecTV’s collection of HD-enabled satellite dishes. A DirecTV Slimline Dish is roughly 18” tall and 22” oval. Since DirecTV satellites are positioned in the Southern Hemisphere, all DirecTV Slimline Dishes must have a clear view of the Southern sky in order to receive DirecTV services.

    • FTA Dish

      FTA Dish

      Free To Air (FTA) dishes receive unencrypted television or radio broadcast signals. They can decode standard MPEG-2/DVB-S for digital television. FTA receivers are designed to detect active transponders and their channels without being pre-programmed thereby collecting any available information they can detect. With the use of these receivers, television viewers can receive transmissions without subscription.

    • PocketDISH

      PocketDISH

      The PocketDISH is a great way to store your favorite TV shows, videos, photos, music, in fact almost any digital media, onto a portable device that can fit in any small bag or pocket. The PocketDISH is created to work with the Dish Network Satellite TV service; however, if you are not a subscriber to

    • DirecTV SWM

      DirecTV SWM

      The DirecTV Single Wire Multiswitch (SWM) is a specially designed piece of hardware that allows a DirecTV satellite dish signal to be split and used with many different tuners/receivers. The usual configurations allow 5, 8, 16, or 32 connections to a single satellite dish. DirecTV SWM is useful because of the satellite dish’s previous configurations,

    • Satellite Television Descrambler

      Satellite Television Descrambler

      Most satellite television is encrypted using conditional access systems such as: DigiCipher II VideoCipher II RS Nagravision VideoGuard Irdeto Mediaguard Viaccess Conex To watch these encrypted television channels, you need a box which can decrypt them. This box is sometimes referred to as a satellite television descrambler. Satellite Television Descramblers Most satellite television descamblers are

    • Dish Network Satellites

      Dish Network Satellites

      Dish Network, and their previously separated partner, EchoStar, have launched dozens of satellites over the past decade in order to provide direct broadcast satellite television services to their subscribers. While each satellite location, known as an “orbital location” provides services to a different region of the Earth, many of the orbital locations contain multiple satellites

    • How Does Satellite TV Work?

      How Does Satellite TV Work?

      Satellite TV works by broadcasting video and audio signals from geostationary satellites to satellite dishes on the Earth’s surface. These geostationary satellites orbit the earth in a region of space known as the Clarke Belt, which is approximately 22,300 miles above the equator. Each of these satellites carries a number of transponders. These transponders each

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