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    • The Kelvin Scale

      The Kelvin Scale

      The Kelvin Scale is a thermometric scale used in physical science to describe the absolute temperature of an object, substance, or area. While Fahrenheit and Celsius scales measure temperature, the Kelvin Scale defines temperatures relative to an object’s thermodynamic movement. As a result, the Kelvin Scale does not use degrees, but simply a number followed

    • How a Laser Printer Works

      How a Laser Printer Works

      A laser printer unlike an inkjet printer uses a laser light beam for printing operations. It is also distinct from other printers because of its exceptional printing speed as well as highly accurate rendering. It utilizes a xerographic (a process of creating an image by the action of light on a specifically coated charged plate)

    • The Coriolis Effect

      The Coriolis Effect

      The Coriolis effect is the tendency for a moving body that is on or above the Earth’s surface to drift sideways from its intended course due to the Earth’s rotation. The direction of drift is to the right in the Northern Hemisphere and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere. This is because the Earth’s

    • Torsional Vibration

      Torsional Vibration

      Solid mechanics defines torsion as the twisting of an object as a result of applied torque. Torsional vibration can be broadly described as the angular vibration of any object. It can be defined specifically as the periodic motion corresponding to a shaft, where the shaft is twisted about its axis, alternating from one direction to

    • Molality

      Molality

      Molality is the number of moles in a solute per kilogram of solvent. It is often confused with the term molarity, which is an alternative unit for concentration that measures the number of moles of solute per liter of solution. Molality is commonly used when experiments require significant temperature changes. This is because a solute’s

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