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  • Microsoft Active Directory

    • The Global Catalog Server

      The Global Catalog Server

      The Global Catalog (GC) is an important component in Active Directory because it serves as the central information store of the Active Directory objects located in domains and forests. Because the GC maintains a list of the Active Directory objects in domains and forests without actually including all information on the objects and it is

    • Active Directory Organizational Units

      Active Directory Organizational Units

      An object is a set of attributes that represents a network resource, say a user, a computer, a group policy, etc and object attributes are characteristics of that object stored in the directory. For example, some of the attributes of a user object might include the user's first name, last name, department, and e-mail address

    • Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory or directory service management is a vital component of any administration process if Active Directory is implemented in the networking environment. The two types of management or administration methods that can be utilized to manage the directory service are: Administrative tools that utilize a graphical user interface (GUI). Command-line tools. Windows Server 2003

    • Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory is a distributed multimaster replicated database. All domain controllers host a full replica of the domain information for its own domain. Domain controllers in Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 environments hold a read/write copy of the Active Directory database. In these environments, changes can be made to the Active Directory database on

    • Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Understanding the Different Server Roles The server roles that exist in a networking environment are standalone servers, member servers and domain controllers. A standalone server is a computer that is not member of a domain, and can be a computer running Windows NT 4, Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003. A test server is a

    • Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      On Overview on Group Policy Object (GPO) Implementation and the Group Policy Object Editor Group Policy settings are stored in a Group Policy Object (GPO). The types of Group Policy settings which can be stored in a GPO are listed below: Computer configuration settings are located in the Computer Configuration node. User configuration settings are

    • Managing Recipient Objects, Address Lists, and Distribution and Administrative Groups

      Managing Recipient Objects, Address Lists, and Distribution and Administrative Groups

      Recipient Objects Overview Active Directory objects such as user accounts, contacts and groups become recipient objects when e-mail address information is added to the object. The public folder is another type of recipient object. A public folder does not however usually have its own an email address. Exchange Server 2003 supports the following types of

    • Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Active Directory fulfills all the needs of an organization by designing a directory structure. It provides flexibility in designing the business structure according to current and future needs for an organization, so it should be examined prior to installing active directory. In Active Directory, resources are organized in a logical structure, and this grouping of

    • How to Backup Active Directory

      How to Backup Active Directory

      Backing up Active Directory is essential to maintaining an Active Directory database. Users can back up Active Directory with the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command-line tools that the Windows Server 2003 family provides. Users should frequently backup the system state data on domain controllers so that they can restore the most current data. By

    • Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Domain and forest functional levels provide a means of enabling additional domain and forest-wide Active Directory features, remove outdated backward compatibility in an environment, and improve Active Directory performance and security. In Windows 2000, the terminology for domain functional levels was domain modes. Forests in Windows 2000 have one mode and domains can have the

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