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  • Microsoft Active Directory

    • Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Understanding the Different Server Roles The server roles that exist in a networking environment are standalone servers, member servers and domain controllers. A standalone server is a computer that is not member of a domain, and can be a computer running Windows NT 4, Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003. A test server is a

    • Directory Partitions

      Directory Partitions

      The Active Directory database is logically separated into directory partitions: Schema partition Configuration partition Domain partition Application partition Each partition is a unit of replication and each partition has its own replication topology. Replication occurs between directory partition replicas. Minimum two directory partitions are common among all domain controllers in the same forest: the schema

    • Group Policy

      Group Policy

      Group Policy gives users administrative control over people and computers in the user’s network. By using Group Policy, users can define the state of someone’s work environment once, then rely on Windows Server 2003 to continually force the Group Policy settings applied across an entire organization or to specific groups of people and computers. Group

    • Understanding Trust Relationships

      Understanding Trust Relationships

      In the Windows NT domain model, domains had to be bound together through trust relationships simply because the SAM databases used in those domains could not be joined. What this meant was that where a domain trusted another Windows NT domain, the members of the domain could access network resources located in the other domain.

    • Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      The Domain is the core unit of logical structure in Active Directory. All objects that share a common directory database and trust relationship with other domain and security policies are known as Domains. Each domain stores information only about the objects that belong to that domain. All security polices and settings, such as administrative rights,

    • The Global Catalog Server

      The Global Catalog Server

      The Global Catalog (GC) is an important component in Active Directory because it serves as the central information store of the Active Directory objects located in domains and forests. Because the GC maintains a list of the Active Directory objects in domains and forests without actually including all information on the objects and it is

    • Troubleshooting Active Directory Availability

      Troubleshooting Active Directory Availability

      As an Administrator, ensuring the availability and reliability of the Windows Server Active Directory directory service is extremely important if you are running Active Directory within your environment. Performance problems and poor availability leads to users being unable to perform their tasks or duties within the organization. For instance, when a DNS server fails, it

    • Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory Replication

      The initial Windows NT versions were designed as single master network environments. The primary domain controller (PDC) was responsible for managing the domain database’s master copy. The PDC was therefore responsible for replicating any changes to the backup domain controllers (BDCs). In these environments, any changes had to be performed on the PDC, which then

    • Physical Structure of Active Directory

      Physical Structure of Active Directory

      In comparison to the logical structure, which performs administrative tasks, the Active Directory physical structure checks when and where logon and replication traffic occurs. The physical structure of Active Directory contains all the physical subnets present in your network like domain controllers and replication between domain controllers. The physical structure of Active Directory: Domain Controllers:

    • Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory is a distributed multimaster replicated database. All domain controllers host a full replica of the domain information for its own domain. Domain controllers in Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 environments hold a read/write copy of the Active Directory database. In these environments, changes can be made to the Active Directory database on

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