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    • Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory Replication

      The initial Windows NT versions were designed as single master network environments. The primary domain controller (PDC) was responsible for managing the domain database’s master copy. The PDC was therefore responsible for replicating any changes to the backup domain controllers (BDCs). In these environments, any changes had to be performed on the PDC, which then

    • Active Directory Operations Masters

      Active Directory Operations Masters

      When a change is made to a domain, the change is replicated across all of the domain controllers in the domain. Some changes, such as those made to the schema, are replicated across all of the domains in the forest. This replication is called multimaster replication. But few changes are practically not possible to perform

    • Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      A group can be defined as a collection of accounts that are grouped together so that Administrators can assign permissions and rights to the group as a single entity. This removes the need for an Administrator to individually assign permissions and rights to each account. Therefore, while a user account is associated with an individual

    • Active Directory Groups

      Active Directory Groups

      Groups are containers that contain user and computer objects within them as members. When security permissions are set for a group in the Access Control List on a resource, all members of that group receive those permissions. Domain Groups enable centralized administration in a domain. All domain groups are created on a domain controller. In

    • Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Active Directory fulfills all the needs of an organization by designing a directory structure. It provides flexibility in designing the business structure according to current and future needs for an organization, so it should be examined prior to installing active directory. In Active Directory, resources are organized in a logical structure, and this grouping of

    • Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      What is Group Policy Group Policy is an Active Directory feature that provides the means for you to effectively and efficiently manage large numbers of computers. You can manage both user and computer configuration settings centrally, from one position of administration. You can define group policies as being a collection of user and computer configuration

    • Replication Topology in Active Directory

      Replication Topology in Active Directory

      Replication Topology is the route by which replication data travels throughout a network. Replication occurs between two domain controllers at a time. Over time, replication synchronizes information in Active Directory for an entire forest of domain controllers. To create a replication topology active directory must determine which domain controller's replicate data with other domain controllers.

    • Global Catalog

      Global Catalog

      The global catalog is a distributed data repository that is stored in global catalog servers and issued via multimaster replication. It basically is composed of a representation (partial) of every object in the multidomain Active Directory forest that can also be searched. The global catalog is used because searches can be made faster because they

    • Directory Partitions

      Directory Partitions

      The Active Directory database is logically separated into directory partitions: Schema partition Configuration partition Domain partition Application partition Each partition is a unit of replication and each partition has its own replication topology. Replication occurs between directory partition replicas. Minimum two directory partitions are common among all domain controllers in the same forest: the schema

    • Understanding Trust Relationships

      Understanding Trust Relationships

      In the Windows NT domain model, domains had to be bound together through trust relationships simply because the SAM databases used in those domains could not be joined. What this meant was that where a domain trusted another Windows NT domain, the members of the domain could access network resources located in the other domain.

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