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    • Physical Structure of Active Directory

      Physical Structure of Active Directory

      In comparison to the logical structure, which performs administrative tasks, the Active Directory physical structure checks when and where logon and replication traffic occurs. The physical structure of Active Directory contains all the physical subnets present in your network like domain controllers and replication between domain controllers. The physical structure of Active Directory: Domain Controllers:

    • Understanding Trust Relationships

      Understanding Trust Relationships

      In the Windows NT domain model, domains had to be bound together through trust relationships simply because the SAM databases used in those domains could not be joined. What this meant was that where a domain trusted another Windows NT domain, the members of the domain could access network resources located in the other domain.

    • Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Understanding the Different Server Roles The server roles that exist in a networking environment are standalone servers, member servers and domain controllers. A standalone server is a computer that is not member of a domain, and can be a computer running Windows NT 4, Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003. A test server is a

    • Directory Partitions

      Directory Partitions

      The Active Directory database is logically separated into directory partitions: Schema partition Configuration partition Domain partition Application partition Each partition is a unit of replication and each partition has its own replication topology. Replication occurs between directory partition replicas. Minimum two directory partitions are common among all domain controllers in the same forest: the schema

    • Planning a Group Policy Strategy

      Planning a Group Policy Strategy

      On Overview on Group Policy Before you can consider to even begin planning a Group Policy implementation in your organization, you have to understand a few important aspects of Group Policy. Microsoft initially introduced group policies in Windows NT to assist administrators in managing the desktop configuration settings of users and computers. Windows Server 2000

    • Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      A group can be defined as a collection of accounts that are grouped together so that Administrators can assign permissions and rights to the group as a single entity. This removes the need for an Administrator to individually assign permissions and rights to each account. Therefore, while a user account is associated with an individual

    • Global Catalog

      Global Catalog

      The global catalog is a distributed data repository that is stored in global catalog servers and issued via multimaster replication. It basically is composed of a representation (partial) of every object in the multidomain Active Directory forest that can also be searched. The global catalog is used because searches can be made faster because they

    • Active Directory

      Active Directory

      Active Directory (AD) is a structure used on computers and servers running the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS). AD is used to store network, domain, and user information and was originally created by Microsoft in 1996. It was first deployed on Microsoft Windows 2000. Active directories provide a number of functions to include providing information

    • Active Directory Groups

      Active Directory Groups

      Groups are containers that contain user and computer objects within them as members. When security permissions are set for a group in the Access Control List on a resource, all members of that group receive those permissions. Domain Groups enable centralized administration in a domain. All domain groups are created on a domain controller. In

    • Publishing Resources in Active Directory

      Publishing Resources in Active Directory

      What Resources can be published in Active Directory When you make Active Directory objects available to users, you are publishing the Active Directory resource. The resources that can be published in Active Directory include the Active Directory resources listed below: User objects Computer objects Printer objects Folders and files Network services The two primary published

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