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    • Deploying Software through Group Policy

      Deploying Software through Group Policy

      When Active Directory was launched in Windows 2000, one of its key design features was to ease the process of deploying software within an organization. To this end, Microsoft included the ability to deploy and distribute software with Group Policy. IntelliMirror technologies include Group Policy software installation to simplify the management necessary for large quantities

    • Active Directory Authentication Types

      Active Directory Authentication Types

      The two types of authentication are Mutual Authentication and NTLM. Mutual Authentication requires both the server and the client to identify them. NTLM only requires the client to be validated by the server. Two types of authentication are Mutual Authentication and NTLM Authentication. Mutual Authentication Mutual Authentication is a security feature in which a client

    • Active Directory Security

      Active Directory Security

      Active Directory security is determined by the following components: * Security groups: A security group is a made up of a set of users, and is created to assign permissions to access resources, and to assign user rights to group members. Permissions control access to resources, while user rights define what actions users can perform.

    • How to Backup Active Directory

      How to Backup Active Directory

      Backing up Active Directory is essential to maintaining an Active Directory database. Users can back up Active Directory with the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command-line tools that the Windows Server 2003 family provides. Users should frequently backup the system state data on domain controllers so that they can restore the most current data. By

    • Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      What is Group Policy Group Policy is an Active Directory feature that provides the means for you to effectively and efficiently manage large numbers of computers. You can manage both user and computer configuration settings centrally, from one position of administration. You can define group policies as being a collection of user and computer configuration

    • Backing Up and Restoring Active Directory

      Backing Up and Restoring Active Directory

      An Overview on Backing up and Restoring Active Directory To ensure availability of mission critical resources and network objects, and business continuity, you would need to perform back ups of Active Directory if it is running in your environment. This is because Active Directory normally hosts mission critical data, and resources. Backups are typically preformed

    • Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      On Overview on Group Policy Object (GPO) Implementation and the Group Policy Object Editor Group Policy settings are stored in a Group Policy Object (GPO). The types of Group Policy settings which can be stored in a GPO are listed below: Computer configuration settings are located in the Computer Configuration node. User configuration settings are

    • Managing Recipient Objects, Address Lists, and Distribution and Administrative Groups

      Managing Recipient Objects, Address Lists, and Distribution and Administrative Groups

      Recipient Objects Overview Active Directory objects such as user accounts, contacts and groups become recipient objects when e-mail address information is added to the object. The public folder is another type of recipient object. A public folder does not however usually have its own an email address. Exchange Server 2003 supports the following types of

    • Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding the Operations Master Roles Active Directory operates in a multi-master replication manner. What this means is that each domain controller in the domain holds a readable, writable replica of the Active Directory data store. In multi-master replication, any domain controller is able to change objects within Active Directory. Multi-master replication is ideal for the

    • Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory is a distributed multimaster replicated database. All domain controllers host a full replica of the domain information for its own domain. Domain controllers in Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 environments hold a read/write copy of the Active Directory database. In these environments, changes can be made to the Active Directory database on

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