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    • Troubleshooting Group Policy

      Troubleshooting Group Policy

      Through Group Policy, a wide variety of user and computer configuration settings can be applied to users and computers in Active Directory. If an Active Directory environment includes a hierarchy with many different organizational unit (OU) levels, when group policies are applied at these different levels within the hierarchy, it is almost certain that Group

    • Active Directory Organizational Units

      Active Directory Organizational Units

      An object is a set of attributes that represents a network resource, say a user, a computer, a group policy, etc and object attributes are characteristics of that object stored in the directory. For example, some of the attributes of a user object might include the user's first name, last name, department, and e-mail address

    • Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Domain and forest functional levels provide a means of enabling additional domain and forest-wide Active Directory features, remove outdated backward compatibility in an environment, and improve Active Directory performance and security. In Windows 2000, the terminology for domain functional levels was domain modes. Forests in Windows 2000 have one mode and domains can have the

    • Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory or directory service management is a vital component of any administration process if Active Directory is implemented in the networking environment. The two types of management or administration methods that can be utilized to manage the directory service are: Administrative tools that utilize a graphical user interface (GUI). Command-line tools. Windows Server 2003

    • Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      What is Group Policy Group Policy is an Active Directory feature that provides the means for you to effectively and efficiently manage large numbers of computers. You can manage both user and computer configuration settings centrally, from one position of administration. You can define group policies as being a collection of user and computer configuration

    • Physical Structure of Active Directory

      Physical Structure of Active Directory

      In comparison to the logical structure, which performs administrative tasks, the Active Directory physical structure checks when and where logon and replication traffic occurs. The physical structure of Active Directory contains all the physical subnets present in your network like domain controllers and replication between domain controllers. The physical structure of Active Directory: Domain Controllers:

    • Deploying Software through Group Policy

      Deploying Software through Group Policy

      When Active Directory was launched in Windows 2000, one of its key design features was to ease the process of deploying software within an organization. To this end, Microsoft included the ability to deploy and distribute software with Group Policy. IntelliMirror technologies include Group Policy software installation to simplify the management necessary for large quantities

    • Replication Topology in Active Directory

      Replication Topology in Active Directory

      Replication Topology is the route by which replication data travels throughout a network. Replication occurs between two domain controllers at a time. Over time, replication synchronizes information in Active Directory for an entire forest of domain controllers. To create a replication topology active directory must determine which domain controller's replicate data with other domain controllers.

    • Group Policy

      Group Policy

      Group Policy gives users administrative control over people and computers in the user’s network. By using Group Policy, users can define the state of someone’s work environment once, then rely on Windows Server 2003 to continually force the Group Policy settings applied across an entire organization or to specific groups of people and computers. Group

    • How to Backup Active Directory

      How to Backup Active Directory

      Backing up Active Directory is essential to maintaining an Active Directory database. Users can back up Active Directory with the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and command-line tools that the Windows Server 2003 family provides. Users should frequently backup the system state data on domain controllers so that they can restore the most current data. By

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