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  • Data Link Layer

    • ARP (Address Resolution Protocol)

      ARP (Address Resolution Protocol)

      ARP is the Address Resolution Protocol. The ARP protocol maps addresses between the Data Link Layer and the Network Layer of the OSI Model. The Data Link layer of TCP/IP networks utilizes MAC addresses; the Network Layer of TCP/IP networks utilizes IP addresses. ARP and RARP The ARP protocol is used to map IP addresses

    • Ethernet Cable Pinout

      Ethernet Cable Pinout

      Ethernet cable connects a network interface card (NIC) with a hub or Ethernet switch. Ethernet cables can be purchased from a computer store. They come in two categories, flat and braided. The flat or solid cable is used when there is a need for a longer cable run. However, it is not flexible. Thus, its

    • CSMA/CD

      CSMA/CD

      CSMA/CD (Carrier Sense Multiple Access / Collision Detection) is the protocol used in Ethernet networks to ensure that only one network node is transmitting on the network wire at any one time. Carrier Sense means that every Ethernet device listens to the Ethernet wire before it attempts to transmit. If the Ethernet device senses that

    • ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network)

      ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network)

      ISDN (Integrated Services Digital Network) is a system of digital phone connections that has been designed for sending voice, video, and data simultaneously over digital or ordinary phone lines, with a much faster speed and higher quality than an analog system can provide. ISDN is basically a set of protocol for making and breaking circuit

    • How to Change a MAC Address

      How to Change a MAC Address

      Every Ethernet card had a factory assigned MAC address burned into it when it was made. At times, users may want to change this MAC address to one of their choice. One of the main reasons for doing this is to get around access control lists(s) on a specific router or server, either by hiding

    • Proxy ARP

      Proxy ARP

      ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is used by network systems to convert system communications from the routable layer 3 IP protocol to the non-routable layer 2 data link layer protocols. In most cases, you don’t need to modify this behavior at all, and system communications are optimal. In special circumstances it is preferable to have another

    • DOCSIS (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification)

      DOCSIS (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification)

      Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification (DOCSIS) defines the interface standards for cable modems and supporting equipment involved in high speed data transfer and distribution over cable television system networks. It permits additional high-speed data transfer over an existing cable TV system and is widely used by television operators to offer Internet access through an

    • Ethernet Hub

      Ethernet Hub

      For any two devices to be connected, they need a common place, or a hub, as it is called in the computer world. It basically connects multiple computers together. Most of the hubs available in the market today support Ethernet standards. This is why they are called Ethernet hubs, and are most commonly used in

    • Tunneling

      Tunneling

      Tunneling is a way in which data is transferred between two networks securely. All the data being transferred is fragmented into smaller packets or frames and then passed through the tunnel. This process is different from a normal data transfer between nodes. Every frame passing through the tunnel will be encrypted with an additional layer

    • Ethernet

      Ethernet

      Ethernet is the most common LAN (Local Area Network) technology in use today. Xerox developed Ethernet in the 1970s, and became popular after Digital Equipment Corporation and Intel joined Xerox in developing the Ethernet standard in 1980. Ethernet was officially accepted as IEEE standard 802.3 in 1985. The term “Ethernet” is now used to refer

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