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    • Network Attacks

      Network Attacks

      Understanding Network Attacks A network attack can be defined as any method, process, or means used to maliciously attempt to compromise network security. There are a number of reasons that an individual(s) would want to attack corporate networks. The individuals performing network attacks are commonly referred to as network attackers, hackers, or crackers. A few

    • Packet Sniffers

      Packet Sniffers

      Packet sniffing is listening (with software) to the raw network device for interesting packets. When the software sees a packet that fits certain criteria, it logs it to a file. The most common criterion for an interesting packet is one that contains words like “login” or “password.” To packet sniff, obtain or code a packet

    • Packet Fragmentation

      Packet Fragmentation

      Every packet based network has an MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit) size. The MTU is the size of the largest packet that that network can transmit. Packets larger than the allowable MTU must be divided into smaller packets or fragments to enable them to traverse the network. Network Standard MTU Ethernet 1500 Token Ring 4096 Packet

    • Responding to Network Attacks and Security Incidents

      Responding to Network Attacks and Security Incidents

      Network Attacks Review A network attack occurs when an attacker or hacker uses certain methods or technologies to maliciously attempt to compromise the security of a network. Hackers attack corporate networks to use data for financial gain or for industrial espionage, to illegally use user accounts and privileges, to run code to damage and corrupt

    • LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol)

      LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol)

      LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a protocol for communications between LDAP servers and LDAP clients. LDAP servers store "directories" which are access by LDAP clients. LDAP is called lightweight because it is a smaller and easier protocol which was derived from the X.500 DAP (Directory Access Protocol) defined in the OSI network protocol stack.

    • IP Address Spoofing

      IP Address Spoofing

      IP address spoofing denotes the action of generating IP packets with fake source IP addresses in order to impersonate other systems or to protect the identity of the sender. Spoofing can also refer to forging or using fake headers on emails or netnews to – again – protect the identity of the sender and to

    • LDAP Security Issues

      LDAP Security Issues

      RFC 2829 – Authentication Methods for LDAP defines the basic threats to an LDAP directory service: Unauthorized access to data via data-fetching operations, Unauthorized access to reusable client authentication information by monitoring others' access, Unauthorized access to data by monitoring others' access, Unauthorized modification of data, Unauthorized modification of configuration, Unauthorized or excessive use of

    • Two Factor Authentication

      Two Factor Authentication

      Two factor authentication is term used to describe any authentication mechanism where more than one thing is required to authentate a user. The two components of two factor authentication are: Something you know Something you have Traditional authentication schemes used username and password pairs to authenticate users. This provides minimal security, because many user passwords

    • RADIUS Server

      RADIUS Server

      RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service) is a system procedure that offers centralized entrance, approval, as well as accounting administration for individuals or computers to add and utilize a network service. Individuals often need “Authentication” when they try to fix to a network. People have to face far more problems while connecting their computers

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