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    • What is Stereoscopic Vision?

      What is Stereoscopic Vision?

      The term stereoscopic vision refers to the human ability to view with both eyes in similar, but slightly different ways. This allows humans to judge distance, which develops their ability to have true depth perception. Historically, the human’s ability to view the world through stereoscopic sight has given him/her a significant advantage over entities and

    • How Overhead Projectors Work

      How Overhead Projectors Work

      Overhead projectors work with the help of transparencies. All data are printed on top of the transparencies. Before starting up, be sure to have a socket with live electricity where you can switch the overhead projector. The power buttons are usually made of first class plastic, the “click” sound is heard; it means it has

    • How Do Light Bulbs Work?

      How Do Light Bulbs Work?

      The light bulb, invented in 1854, has been a crucial component of civilization since. Contrary to popular belief, the light bulb was invented by Henricg Globel, a German watchmaker, not Thomas Edison. Edison did improve on the idea of the incandescent light bulb, though, and strived to make it better. Due to the works of

    • Parabolic Mirror

      Parabolic Mirror

      Parabolic mirrors are specially shaped in order to capture and focus energy onto a single point. They also distribute energy from a single point outwards. The mirrors are a specific paraboloid type that is rotated around its axis, and is also known as a circular paraboloid. Parabolic mirrors are also referred to as parabolic reflectors

    • How a Laser Printer Works

      How a Laser Printer Works

      A laser printer unlike an inkjet printer uses a laser light beam for printing operations. It is also distinct from other printers because of its exceptional printing speed as well as highly accurate rendering. It utilizes a xerographic (a process of creating an image by the action of light on a specifically coated charged plate)

    • What is the Tyndall Effect?

      What is the Tyndall Effect?

      The Tyndall Effect refers to the reflection of light as it comes in contact with small particles in a translucent medium. It involves the scattering of light in different colors depending on how short or long a particular wavelength is. For example, the Tyndall Effect can describe the haze seen as light travels through a

    • Holograms

      Holograms

      Holograms are three-dimensional images produced through photographic projection. Unlike 3-D graphics or Virtual Reality or Augmented reality displays where the image is projected in a two-dimensional surface and where the illusion of depth is applied, holograms are truly three-dimensional images that do not need special viewing equipments. The first hologram was created in 1947 by

    • What is a Diopter?

      What is a Diopter?

      A diopter is a lens that bends light in order to magnify an object. Diopters can be used to enlarge small objects or see across far distances and are generally integrated into other objects in order to maximize efficiency and accessibility. A diopter can also refer to a measurement that describes a lens’s optical power

    • What Are Photonic Crystals?

      What Are Photonic Crystals?

      Photonic crystals are those that manipulate how photons are absorbed or reflected off of them. They occur in nature and are made of dielectric nanostructures that allow certain wavelengths to pass through them while blocking other wavelengths. The visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum’s wavelengths is responsible for colors, therefore photonic crystals can spontaneously

    • What is Electroluminescence?

      What is Electroluminescence?

      Electroluminescence is the phenomenon where a material emits light when electricity is passed through it. It is one of the greatest discoveries of the twentieth century and other forms of luminescence, including incandescence, chemiluminescence, cathodoluminescence, triboluminescence, and photoluminescence rival it. Electroluminescence generally involves a material producing light without producing heat. It is different from black

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