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    • How to Encrypt an entire Disk

      How to Encrypt an entire Disk

      Sometimes instead of encrypting a file or a set of files, you want to encrypt an entire file system, partition, or disk. One of the chief advantages of this approach is that, once you have entered your encryption key, the encryption becomes transparent to both you and your applications. When you power off your computer,

    • One-Time Pad

      One-Time Pad

      A one-time pad is a form of encryption that is difficult to decipher or crack if one is not the intended recipient. If done correctly, the strength of encryption of plaintext can almost be impossible to break in a useful timeframe. The system takes each character from plaintext and uses modular addition with a character

    • Kerberos

      Kerberos

      Kerberos is a network authentication protocol which utilizes symmetric cryptography to provide authentication for client-server applications. Kerberos Standard Definition Kerberos is defined in RFC 1510 – The Kerberos Network Authentication Service (V5). Kerberos Architecture The core of  Kerberos architecture is the KDC (Key Distribution Server). The KDC stores authentication information and uses it to securely

    • AES (Rijndael)

      AES (Rijndael)

      AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) is the currently employed specification for encrypting electronic data by the United States National Institute of Standards and Technology, or NIST. AES was selected as the U.S. standard for encryption of unclassified information in 2001 supplanting DES which had been the U.S. standards for a number of years (since 1977). AES

    • MD5 (Message Digest 5)

      MD5 (Message Digest 5)

      MD5 is a message digest algorithm. MD5 takes a variable length input and produces a 128-bit message digest. MD5 was designed by Ron Rivest in 1991. MD5 is officially defined in RFC 1321 – The MD5 Message-Digest Algorithm. MD5 Usage MD5 is used in many applications, including GPG, Kerberos, TLS / SSL, Cisco type 5

    • Dictionary Attacks

      Dictionary Attacks

      A dictionary attack consists of trying “every word in the dictionary” as a possible password for an encrypted message. A dictionary attack is generally more efficient than a brute force attack because users typically choose poor passwords. Dictionary attacks are generally far less successful against systems that use passphrases instead of passwords. Improving Dictionary Attacks

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