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    • The SMA Connector

      The SMA Connector

      The SMA (SubMiniature Type A) connector is a type of the radio frequency connector developed in the 1960s to make it easier to connect coaxial cables. Using a screw-type design instead of the common ‘push-pull’ system, the SMA connector allows for a quick connection; and can be used in both alternating and direct current applications.

    • What is a CMOS Inverter?

      What is a CMOS Inverter?

      A CMOS (Complementary Metal-oxide Semiconductor) inverter is a device that produces logic functions and is the primary component of all integrated circuits. A CMOS inverter is a field-effect transistor that is composed of a metal gate that lies on top of an insulating layer of oxygen, which lies on top of a semiconductor. CMOS inverters

    • Radar Jammer

      Radar Jammer

      A radar jammer is a piece of equipment used to scramble nearby radar signals. Radar jammers are often used by drivers to jam the signals coming out from police speed detectors. The radar jammer is very similar to the Power Drainer and is the size of a small box. Radar Jamming as a Crime There

    • Circuit Simulator

      Circuit Simulator

      A circuit simulator is a computer program that predicts how electronic circuits work. Circuit designs are first entered through the schematic editor, then the simulation engine solves the complex equations that govern circuit behavior. Circuit simulators are especially useful for designing integrated circuits that are impractical to prototype using breadboards. The three types of simulator

    • Internet Repeater

      Internet Repeater

      An Internet repeater is a device that allows amateur radio operators to communicate with each other over the Internet, much like how VoIP software allows telephone operators to communicate with each other over the Internet. Internet repeaters should not be confused with wireless repeaters, which allow users to extend the range of a wireless network.

    • Siemens (Unit of Electrical Conductance)

      Siemens (Unit of Electrical Conductance)

      The siemens is the standard unit of electrical conductance. It is the inverse of resistance and is equal to one divided by resistance, or current divided by voltage. One siemens is equal to one ampere per volt. History of the Siemens The siemens was defined at an international conference in 1881, and is named after

    • Capacitor

      Capacitor

      In a very simple sense, a capacitor is a device that stores energy in an electric field between two charged "plates" for a short period of time. The electric charge is then used or dissipated at an appropriate time. The capacitor essentially works along the same lines as the battery you might find in a

    • Rheostats

      Rheostats

      A rheostat is an electrical component that has an adjustable resistance. It is a type of potentiometer that has two terminals instead of three. The two main types of rheostat are the rotary and slider. The symbol for a rheostat is a resistor symbol with an arrow diagonally across it. Rheostats are used in many

    • Amplitude Modulation

      Amplitude Modulation

      Amplitude modulation is a type of modulation where the carrier signal’s amplitude is varied in accordance with the information bearing signal. The amplitude modulated signal’s envelope or boundary embeds the information bearing signal. The total power of the transmitted signal varies with the modulating signal, whereas the carrier power remains constant. A nonlinear device combines

    • Pulse Amplitude Modulation

      Pulse Amplitude Modulation

      Pulse Amplitude Modulation (PAM) is the simplest form of pulse modulation. This technique transmits data by varying the voltage or power amplitudes of individual pulses in a timed sequence of electromagnetic pulses. In other words, the data to be transmitted is encoded in the amplitude of a series of signal pulses. PAM can also be

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