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  • Network Layer

    • What is NetBEUI?

      What is NetBEUI?

      NetBEUI (NetBIOS Extended User Interface) is an extended version of NetBIOS, the primary software that allows individual computers to communicate within a given local area network. While NetBIOS itself is most often used to transfer pictures, documents, videos, or other files from one computer to another, NetBEUI is responsible for arranging the actual information in

    • Routing Tables

      Routing Tables

      A routing table is a grouping of information stored on a networked computer or network router that includes a list of routes to various network destinations. The data is normally stored in a database table and in more advanced configurations includes performance metrics associated with the routes stored in the table. Additional information stored in

    • ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol)

      ICMP (Internet Control Message Protocol)

      ICMP is the Internet Control Message Protocol. ICMP is a complementary protocol to IP (Internet Protocol). Like IP, ICMP resides on the Network Layer of the OSI Model. ICMP is designed for sending control and test messages across IP networks. Unlike the Transport Layer protocols TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) and UDP (User Datagram Protocol) which

    • DHCP Scope

      DHCP Scope

      A DHCP scope is a valid range of IP addresses that are available for assignment or lease to client computers on a particular subnet. In a DHCP server, a scope is configured to determine the address pool of IPs that the server can provide to DHCP clients. Scopes determine which IP addresses are provided to

    • traceroute

      traceroute

      traceroute is a command which is used to trace the route of a packet through a TCP/IP network. traceroute is a Unix command. Under Microsoft Windows, the traceroute command has been renamed `tracert`. Unix `traceroute` and Microsoft Windows `tracert` are designed to accomplish the same task, but differ in the way they display output, in

    • IP Address Conflict

      IP Address Conflict

      An IP (or Internet Protocol) address conflict occurs when two different systems on the same subnet are assigned or otherwise have their network interface configured to use the same IP address. It is possible to have two systems on different subnets configured with the same IP address, but not have a conflict occur due to

    • What is an L2TP?

      What is an L2TP?

      L2TP (Layer Two Tunneling Protocol) defines an extension to PPTP (Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol) that an ISP (Internet Service Provider) uses to allow a VPN (Virtual Private Network) to operate. L2TP combines L2F from Cisco Systems’ optimum features and PPTP from Microsoft into a single protocol. L2TP’s two primary components are the LNS (L2TP Network Server)

    • 192.168

      192.168

      The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) has allocated three IP address ranges that are to be exclusively used for private Internet networks: 10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255 (10/8 prefix) 172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255 (172.16/12 prefix) 192.168.0.0 – 192.168.255.255 (192.168/16 prefix) The first block “10.0.0.0 – 10.255.255.255” is referred to as the 24-bit block, the second “172.16.0.0 – 172.31.255.255”

    • Null Route

      Null Route

      A null route is a route that goes to nowhere. The reason for creating a null route is to prevent your system from sending any data to a remote system. Creating a null route Null routes are usually created using the `route` command. This works under both Windows and Unix, although the syntax differs. The

    • Routing Software

      Routing Software

      Most networks currently run on hardware-based routers from vendors like Cisco, Foundry, and Juniper. Computing power has advanced to the point where this is not necessary. General purpose computing platforms can replace these expensive dedicated hardware routers. These software routing platforms usually run on some version of free or inexpensive Unix. These are a few

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