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  • Network Layer

    • BOOTP

      BOOTP

      BOOTP is the Bootstrap Protocol. The BOOTP protocol is utilized by diskless workstations to gather configuration information from a network server. The information provided by the BOOTP protocol is: The IP address which should be utilized by the diskless workstation The IP address of a server which will provide an Operating System image for the

    • Frame vs Packet

      Frame vs Packet

      A packet and a frame are both packages of data moving through a network. A packet exists at Layer 3 of the OSI Model, whereas a frame exists at Layer 2 of the OSI Model. Layer 2 is the Data Link Layer. The best known Data Link Layer protocol is Ethernet. Layer 3 is the

    • Network Routers

      Network Routers

      A network router is a network device with interfaces in multiple networks whose task is to copy packets from one network to another. Routers operate at Layer 3 of the OSI Model, the Network Layer. This is in contrast to switches, which operate at Layer 2 of the OSI Model, the Data-Link Layer. A network

    • VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol)

      VRRP (Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol)

      VRRP stands for Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol. The VRRP is a commonly used method to avoid network outages during important data transfers. Data transfer can be highly susceptible to failure when sent by a single router network. To combat this problem, VRRP creates a virtual connection between routers within the same network and ties them

    • Routing Protocols

      Routing Protocols

      A routing protocol is the implementation of a routing algorithm in software or hardware. A routing protocol uses metrics to determine which path to utilize to transmit a packet across an internetwork. The metrics that routing protocols use include: Number of network layer devices along the path (hop count) Bandwidth Delay Load MTU Cost Routing

    • Routing

      Routing

      Routing is the process of moving packets through an internetwork, such as the Internet. Routing actually consists of two separate, but related, tasks: Defining paths for the transmission of packets through an internetwork. Forwarding packets based upon the defined paths. Routing takes place in IP networks, based on IP routing tables and its entries. The

    • IP Address

      IP Address

      An IP (Internet Protocol) address is a unique address that different computers on a computer network use to identify and communicate with one another. An IP address is used as an identifier to find electronic devices connected to one another on a network. Therefore, each device in the network must have its own unique address.

    • Collision Domain

      Collision Domain

      A computer network can be segmented physically and logically. A collision domain is one of the logical network segments in which the data packets can collide with each other. One of the most common protocols used when referring to a collision domain is the Ethernet protocol. Collision domains are often referred to as ‘Ethernet segments.’

    • Subnetting

      Subnetting

      Subnetting is the process of breaking down an IP network into smaller sub-networks called “subnets.” Each subnet is a non-physical description (or ID) for a physical sub-network (usually a switched network of host containing a single router in a multi-router network). In many cases, subnets are created to serve as physical or geographical separations similar

    • IP Address Classes

      IP Address Classes

      IP Address classes were the original organizational structure for IP addresses. The specific address class would determine the maximum potential size for a computer network. The address class would define which of the specific bits of the address would be used to identify the network and network identification, the bits to identify the host computer

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