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    The Parts of an X-Ray Machine

    There are three main parts of an x-ray machine. The first is the x-ray tube. This is responsible for the creation of x-rays. Therefore, without this functioning properly, there would be little chance for the x-ray to work in the right way. It generates enough x-rays so that when they are sent toward the body, they are able to read what the doctor needs.

    The next element is the high voltage power source. This is important because there are a lot of components that need high voltages to run. For example, the anode needs a lot of voltage to keep the electrons at an excited state. The emitter only needs a low voltage, but it's still a needed voltage. Therefore, having a lot of available voltage is necessary.

    Finally, the console operator is necessary because this is how the doctor turns on and off the machine. Without a functioning one of these, the x-ray machine would not be able to work. When all are combined, these three tools make for a powerful x-ray machine.How Do X-Ray Machines Work

    How Does an X-Ray Machine Work

    Inside of the x-ray tube is a filament or a cathode emitter. Either of these can emit accelerated electrons. When they are released, these accelerated electrons move to the metal anode. This has a current flowing through it that is very strong, courtesy the high voltage power source. This results in a electron beam being created. This beam hits a focal point within the anode. A small amount of this beam is turned into x-ray photons.

    These x-ray photons flow in all different directions until controller is put to use. This console operator determines the right current and voltage to create an x-ray beam. This x-ray beam is then aimed at a target; the leg of a young child who fell of his bike. The x-ray beam enters the leg and takes the necessary picture for the doctor to determine if the leg is broken or not.

    The way it works is simple. X-ray is absorbed by the dense parts of the body. So, the skin, blood vessels and tissue within the body are soft and therefore won't absorb the x-rays. However, the bones will because they are much denser. By absorbing, the machine can create an image for the doctor to analyze with detail on everything. It's because of this that a doctor can determine if a leg is or is not broken.

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