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    • How to Change Your Shell

      How to Change Your Shell

      Under some version of Unix, users can use the `chsh` or `passwd -e` commands to edit the shell configured for their account in the passwd file. Under other Unix variants, only the root user can use these commands. Your shell is defined in the last field of the¬†password file. ¬†If you have “root” privileges, you

    • How to Tell what Shell You’re Using

      How to Tell what Shell You’re Using

      Whatever operating system you choose, a shell will be an important part of it. A shell is usually defined as software that provides the end user with an interface. In technical terms, the shell is the part of the software that gives you access to the kernel. The term shell is used freely and can

    • How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      How to Change an IP Address on Solaris

      To change an IP address on a Solaris system immediately, use the `ifconfig` command. The syntax for `ifconfig` is: ifconfig <interface> <ip address> <netmask> <broadcast address> If the user does not know his/her network interface names, he/she should use the `ifconfig -a` command to list all of the available network interfaces. Permanently Change an IP

    • How to Copy UNIX Files to Windows

      How to Copy UNIX Files to Windows

      For those computer users that have both Unix and Window’s operating systems, you should know that you can easily copy your Unix files from a Unix computer and transfer them to a Windows computer. Using Client for NFS, you can transfer any existing Unix files from your Unix server to a Windows based server. It

    • How to Find Out CPU Utilization in UNIX

      How to Find Out CPU Utilization in UNIX

      Keeping track of your CPU’s performance is extremely important. In UNIX, you can accomplish this task by using the system utilities and commands. For those who would like to find out their CPU utilization, one command is extremely important. It is called SAR – System Activity Reporter. The SAR commands make accessing CPU performance quite

    • Linux Restricted Shell

      Linux Restricted Shell

      The idea of a restricted shell first arose in the Unix operating system in order to prevent the end-user from doing as many operations as a normal shell allows. A restricted shell lets the administrator control the end-user’s computing environment by only permitting explicitly used commands to be used. The Linux restricted shell (rssh) is

    • Configuring a Linux Mail Server

      Configuring a Linux Mail Server

      Configuring Linux Mail Server Linux Mail Server The main purpose of the mail server is concerned with to receive and send emails. S Software applications are used to manage incoming of emails from any other server and to forward it to the destination. There are many web hosting services which provide mailing facilities along with

    • How to Use vi

      How to Use vi

      The vi editor (visual editor) is one of the oldest and more popular text editors on computers running the Unix Operating System (OS). The vi editor can be used from any computer terminal interfacing with a computer running Unix, since the editor relies on the standard alphabet keys for specific commands. Since vi is not

    • How to Use the Unix Top Command

      How to Use the Unix Top Command

      Top is a small, but powerful program on both Unix and Linux systems. Its purpose is to allow users to monitor processes on their system. It has two main sections. The first displays general information such as the load averages, number of running and sleeping tasks, and overall CPU and memory usage. The second main

    • How to Use the Unix Find Command

      How to Use the Unix Find Command

      The Unix find command, as the name implies, is a command that you can enter into the command line, or terminal, of a Unix operating system, allowing you to process any given set of files or directories. It is a highly useful command that you can take advantage of on Unix based operating system, making

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