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    • What is Tar?

      What is Tar?

      Tar refers to a tape archiving file format and the program that creates them. Tar stands for tape archive. It combines multiple files together so that they can be used for programs, applications, and critical system files. While Tar does not directly install files to a user’s hard drive, it is responsible for compiling the

    • How to Use vi

      How to Use vi

      The vi editor (visual editor) is one of the oldest and more popular text editors on computers running the Unix Operating System (OS). The vi editor can be used from any computer terminal interfacing with a computer running Unix, since the editor relies on the standard alphabet keys for specific commands. Since vi is not

    • Unix File Permissions

      Unix File Permissions

      Unix file permissions are based upon an octal code. Unix file permissions are stored in a ten character array. The first character of the file permissions stores the file type. The standard file types are: Character Meaning – Plain file d Directory c Character device b Block device l Symbolic link s Socket = or

    • How to Use the Grep Command

      How to Use the Grep Command

      The grep command is a search command built into a variety of Unix based operating systems. This command line utility, whose name stems from the original Unix term which means “search globally for lines matching the regular expression, and print them,” can be accessed using the command line or terminal from anywhere in the Unix

    • How to Backup Unix

      How to Backup Unix

      Most Unix systems come with several basic backup software options, including dd, cpio, tar, and dump. If the basic backup software included with Unix does not meet your needs, you may want to look at some of the more comprehensive software packages designed to backup Unix and Windows systems. Built-in Unix Backup Software tar tar

    • How to Use the Unix Find Command

      How to Use the Unix Find Command

      The Unix find command, as the name implies, is a command that you can enter into the command line, or terminal, of a Unix operating system, allowing you to process any given set of files or directories. It is a highly useful command that you can take advantage of on Unix based operating system, making

    • Restricted Shells

      Restricted Shells

      A restricted shell is a Unix shell that has been modified to allow the Unix shell user to do fewer things than a normal shell would allow him to do. It may allow the user to run only certain programs. It may stop the user from changing directories. Many sites run their own restricted shells

    • Sudo

      Sudo

      `Sudo` is an enhanced alternative to the Unix `su` command. Sudo stands for “su do,” and means “do something as the supervisor.” Sudo’s Capabilities Sudo allows system administrators to control who can run some (or all) commands as root. This ability to restrict users can be configured on a per-host basis, and is a much

    • How Unix System Logs Files work

      How Unix System Logs Files work

      Unix system log files include: utmp wtmp lastlog Unix records information about current users in the file utmp, logins and logouts in the file wtmp, and last logins in the file lastlog. The time stamps of date changes, shutdowns and reboots are also logged in the wtmp file. The usual locations of these files are:

    • How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      How to Capture a Unix Terminal Session

      One of the best methods to capture a Unix terminal session is to use the `script` command. In this example we start a script session, run a couple of commands, and then use the `exit` command to stop capturing the terminal session: $ script Script started, output file is typescript $ pwd /home/will $ ps

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