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    • NetBIOS Node Types

      NetBIOS Node Types

      A NetBIOS node type is a method that a computer uses to resolve a NetBIOS name into an IP address. A NetBIOS node type allows an administrator to configure the order and method that a client uses when resolving NetBIOS names to IP addresses. Understanding how the various node types function will help users to

    • NetBEUI

      NetBEUI

      NetBEUI (NetBIOS Extended User Interface) is a program used for communication between applications installed on separate computers within the same LAN (Local Area Network). It is an upgraded version of NetBIOS and provides much more flexibility and functionality by rearranging the information in a data transmission. Like NetBIOS, NetBEUI is not a networking protocol and

    • Network Load Balancing

      Network Load Balancing

      Network Load Balancing Overview Network Load Balancing (NLB), included in Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 can be used if you need to provide increased levels of availability for TCP/IP applications. All versions of Windows Server 2003 include NLB. While NLB is automatically installed, it is not enabled. In a NLB cluster, client requests are

    • Understanding NetBIOS Name Resolution

      Understanding NetBIOS Name Resolution

      NetBIOS, broadcasts names to listening nodes on the network. NetBIOS utilizes a User Datagram Protocol (UDP) query to broadcast names. NetBIOS names identified computers on the network before the introduction of Windows 2000. The NetBIOS name is resolved to an IP address through Windows Internet Name Service (WINS), broadcasting, or the LMHOSTS file. If the

    • Understanding the Microsoft Model

      Understanding the Microsoft Model

      Microsoft Model Overview Before Windows NT 3.1 was released, users had to obtain the TCP/IP protocol suite from a third party, and then install it. This was necessary for users to connect to the network, which in turn usually resulted in a number of issues. When it came to network communication, the TCP/IP software which

    • How to Open TCP Ports in Windows

      How to Open TCP Ports in Windows

      Opening TCP ports in Windows may be necessary for certain applications to run correctly. Each application may require a specific port to operate on. While a computer can and does open ports on its own, it may have to be done manually in certain situations. Here is a simple procedure. Step 1. Launch Windows and

    • NetBIOS Names

      NetBIOS Names

      A NetBIOS name is an identifier that NetBIOS services running on a computer use. It is a combination of a 15 character (byte) name and a 16th character denoting the service. These names identify resources on the NetBIOS network. NetBIOS cannot do name resolution on the Internet because NetBIOS names are single part names and

    • Installing and Configuring TCP/IP

      Installing and Configuring TCP/IP

      Installing TCP/IP TCP/IP is installed automatically when the Windows Server 2003 setup process runs. It is not usually necessary to install TCP/IP after the Windows Server 2003 setup process completed. The instances when you might need to manually install TCP/IP are listed below: TCP/IP was disabled when the Windows Server 2003 setup process executed. TCP/IP

    • Analyzing Organizational Requirements for Network Infrastructure Planning

      Analyzing Organizational Requirements for Network Infrastructure Planning

      Determining Information Flow Requirements To determine the information flow of the organization, you need to include a number of factors, of which the main ones are listed below. Accessing data or information should be one of the main concerns when planning the network design: The data that needs to be accessed by users. The location

    • Understanding the Department of Defense Network Model

      Understanding the Department of Defense Network Model

      Department of Defense Network (DoD) Network Model Introduction Back in 1960, systems were primarily made up of mainframe computers, and were typically owned by fairly large companies and government institutions. Because mainframe computers run different proprietary software, and due to mainframes not being able to communicate between each other, special code (interface) had to be

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