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    • How Firewall Protection Works

      How Firewall Protection Works

      Firewall protection works by blocking certain types of traffic between a source and a destination. All network traffic has a source, a destination, and a protocol. This protocol is usually TCP, UDP, or ICMP. If this protocol is TCP or UDP, there is a source port and a destination port. Most often the source port

    • IPsec

      IPsec

      IPSec (IP Security) is a suite of protocols which was designed by Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) to protect data by signing and encrypting data before it is transmitted over public networks. The IETF Request for Comments (RFCs) 2401-2409 defines the IPSec protocols with regard to security protocols, security associations and key management, and authentication

    • IP Address Spoofing

      IP Address Spoofing

      IP address spoofing denotes the action of generating IP packets with fake source IP addresses in order to impersonate other systems or to protect the identity of the sender. Spoofing can also refer to forging or using fake headers on emails or netnews to – again – protect the identity of the sender and to

    • DMZ (DeMilitarized Zone)

      DMZ (DeMilitarized Zone)

      The majority of non-computer professionals think of a DMZ as the strip of land that serves as the buffer between North and South Korea along the 39th parallel north created as part of the Korean Armistice Agreement in 1953. In the computer security field; however, the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) is either a logical or physical

    • LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol)

      LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol)

      LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is a protocol for communications between LDAP servers and LDAP clients. LDAP servers store "directories" which are access by LDAP clients. LDAP is called lightweight because it is a smaller and easier protocol which was derived from the X.500 DAP (Directory Access Protocol) defined in the OSI network protocol stack.

    • Honey Monkey

      Honey Monkey

      Honey monkeys are a new way of detecting malicious codes from websites that try to exploit certain vulnerabilities of Internet browsers. The honey monkey system works as an automated web/internet patrol system that is designed to detect harmful materials in the Internet, to be able to come up with solutions, and to catch the people

    • Cisco VPN Error 412

      Cisco VPN Error 412

      The CISCO VPN Client is a popular software application that allows end-users to connect a computer to a VPN (virtual private network). Once connected, the client computer can leverage the resources of the remote network in a secure environment as if connected directly to the local network. Unfortunately, a common error that can arise for

    • ISAKMP

      ISAKMP

      ISAKMP (Internet Security Association and Key Management Protocol) is a protocol for establishing Security Associations (SA) and cryptographic keys in a internet environment. ISAKMP defines the procedures for authenticating a communicating peer, creation and management of Security Associations, key generation techniques, and threat mitigation (e.g. denial of service and replay attacks). ISAKMP typically utilizes IKE

    • Two Factor Authentication

      Two Factor Authentication

      Two factor authentication is term used to describe any authentication mechanism where more than one thing is required to authentate a user. The two components of two factor authentication are: Something you know Something you have Traditional authentication schemes used username and password pairs to authenticate users. This provides minimal security, because many user passwords

    • RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial in User Service)

      RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial in User Service)

      RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial In User Service), defined in RFC 2865, is a protocol for remote user authentication and accounting. RADIUS enables centralized management of authentication data, such as usernames and passwords. When a user attempts to login to a RADIUS client, such as a router, the router send the authentication request to the RADIUS

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