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    • 568B

      568B

      568B, or more formally EIA/TIA 568B, is one of the International standards which include the definition for how the pins or wires in a RJ-45 cable are arranged or terminated. The termination of the cable can occur at several locations which include an individual cable connecting a computer to an Ethernet port, the ending socket

    • IP (Internet Protocol)

      IP (Internet Protocol)

      The primary network communications protocol used on networks today is the IP (Internet Protocol). IP relays or transfers network packets, also known as datagrams, to destinations on local networks or across the public Internet. It defines the structures which encapsulate information as well as the legal addressing methods used to identify the source and destination

    • VoIP Codecs

      VoIP Codecs

      A codec (Coder/Decoder) converts analog signals to a digital bitstream, and another identical codec at the far end of the communication converts the digital bitstream back into an analog signal. In the VoIP world, codecs are used to encode voice for transmission across IP networks. Codecs for VoIP use are also referred to as vocoders,

    • 802.11a

      802.11a

      802.11a is one of the many standards used for high speed wireless networks, usually referred to as Wifi. This standard was created by the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) in 1999 and uses several different frequencies including 5.15-5.35/5.47-5.725/5.725-5.875 GHz to send and receive data from one electronic or computer device to another. There

    • QoS (Quality of Service)

      QoS (Quality of Service)

      QoS stands for Quality of Service. QoS is a generic name for a set of algorithms which attempt to provide different levels of quality to different types of network traffic. Queuing One method of implementing QoS is to utilize some sort of advanced queuing algorithm. Simple networks process traffic with a FIFO (First In –

    • Range Extender

      Range Extender

      A range extender is a device that can be placed between two connection points in order to bounce a wireless signal from one device to another. Range extenders work great for large offices and factories that need high-speed Internet throughout the premises without running cables or purchasing satellite Internet. Range extenders can be used with

    • Routing Software

      Routing Software

      Most networks currently run on hardware-based routers from vendors like Cisco, Foundry, and Juniper. Computing power has advanced to the point where this is not necessary. General purpose computing platforms can replace these expensive dedicated hardware routers. These software routing platforms usually run on some version of free or inexpensive Unix. These are a few

    • What is MiFi?

      What is MiFi?

      MiFi stands for “My Wi-Fi” or “Mobile Wi-Fi”, and represents a line of relatively small wireless routers developed by Novatel Wireless, which turn a mobile broadband internet connection into a Wi-Fi hotspot. These hotspots support up to 5 Wi-Fi enabled devices within a range of 10 meters. This means that any Wi-Fi enabled device, from

    • FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name)

      FQDN (Fully Qualified Domain Name)

      An FQDN, or Fully-Qualified Domain Name, is a domain name that specifies the exact location of a webpage. An example of an FQDN, would be “https://www.tech-faq.com/”, in which “com” is used to specify the root domain that Tech-FAQ is hosted on, “www” specifies the hostname, and “http” specifies the transfer protocol. While an FTP or

    • Ethernet Hub

      Ethernet Hub

      For any two devices to be connected, they need a common place, or a hub, as it is called in the computer world. It basically connects multiple computers together. Most of the hubs available in the market today support Ethernet standards. This is why they are called Ethernet hubs, and are most commonly used in

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