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    • Magnetic Permeability

      Magnetic Permeability

      Magnetic Permeability is a term refers to the ability of a material to gain or maintain magnetism. When certain materials are placed in a magnetic field they become magnetized.  For example, when you take a piece of iron and rub it on a substance already magnetized or a magnet, it will become magnetized and have a

    • Electromotive Force

      Electromotive Force

      Electromotive force is the electrical potential energy that causes current to flow through a circuit. It results from the difference in charge between two points in a material. This difference is created when an external source such as a battery makes electrons move to both points so that there is an excess at the first

    • How Do Xenon Lights Work?

      How Do Xenon Lights Work?

      Xenon is a noble gas–found all the way to the right on the periodic table of elements–that is odorless, colorless and heavy. It has many different uses, but one of the biggest uses that it has is the use in light bulbs. The reason for this is because when xenon is excited, it gives off

    • What is the Fifth State of Matter?

      What is the Fifth State of Matter?

      The fifth state of matter is actually the first phase of matter. It is called a Bose-Einstein Condensate. Matter in the fifth state is really slow moving and extremely condensed. It only exists at near absolute zero temperatures and is very fragile and unstable. It was discovered in 1995 by Eric Cornell and Carl Weiman through experimentation with rubidium,

    • What is Malleability?

      What is Malleability?

      Malleability refers to metals’ (and other hard materials’) ability to be stretched, shaped, or molded through applied pressure. While not all objects are malleable, most metals are. This is the reason that metals such as gold, silver, and platinum, are used to make jewelry and electronic circuits. Malleable objects can usually be reshaped and molded

    • Eddy Currents

      Eddy Currents

      Eddy currents are also referred to as Foucault currents and are created when conductors are exposed to a changing magnetic field because of a field source’s relative motion. Their applications include induction heating and non-destructive testing. Eddy currents are continually researched in order to develop new applications. How do Eddy Currents Work? Eddy currents are

    • How Do X-Ray Machines Work?

      How Do X-Ray Machines Work?

      The Parts of an X-Ray Machine There are three main parts of an x-ray machine. The first is the x-ray tube. This is responsible for the creation of x-rays. Therefore, without this functioning properly, there would be little chance for the x-ray to work in the right way. It generates enough x-rays so that when

    • How Does Sound Travel?

      How Does Sound Travel?

      Sound is characterised as a series of waves that move through a particular medium. A medium is some sort of a subtance–whether it be water, plasma, air, a solid, or anything else–that these waves move through. The waves cause the particles in this substance to vibrate which is how the sound is potentially heard. A

    • Seebeck Effect

      Seebeck Effect

      The Seebeck Effect was first discovered in 1821. It describes the thermoelectric phenomenon that results when the temperature differences between dissimilar metals in a circuit are converted into electric current. This is one of three similar processes that relate to conductivity, temperature, and thermoelectricity that was discovered in the 1800s. The Thomson Effect was first

    • What is Magnetic Wire?

      What is Magnetic Wire?

      Magnetic wire is a copper or aluminum wire that produces an electromagnetic field when wrapped into a coil and connected to a power supply. It is used in a number of applications and is a vital component in many different devices. Magnetic wire can be used in electrical to electrical, electrical to mechanical, and mechanical

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