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    • Understanding Organizational Units

      Understanding Organizational Units

      An organizational unit (OU) is a container that logically organizes and groups Active Directory objects within domains. OUs are not part of the DNS namespace. They organize Active Directory objects into logical administrative groups. OUs therefore serve as containers in which users can create and manage Active Directory objects. OUs are considered the smallest unit

    • Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding the Operations Master Roles Active Directory operates in a multi-master replication manner. What this means is that each domain controller in the domain holds a readable, writable replica of the Active Directory data store. In multi-master replication, any domain controller is able to change objects within Active Directory. Multi-master replication is ideal for the

    • Active Directory Organizational Units

      Active Directory Organizational Units

      An object is a set of attributes that represents a network resource, say a user, a computer, a group policy, etc and object attributes are characteristics of that object stored in the directory. For example, some of the attributes of a user object might include the user's first name, last name, department, and e-mail address

    • Active Directory Objects

      Active Directory Objects

      The Active Directory data store, also referred to as directory, contains data on users, groups, computers, and on which resources these users, groups, and computers can access. It holds all Active Directory information. Each domain controller within a domain holds a readable/writable replica of the Active Directory data store that consists of information pertaining to

    • Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      On Overview on Group Policy Object (GPO) Implementation and the Group Policy Object Editor Group Policy settings are stored in a Group Policy Object (GPO). The types of Group Policy settings which can be stored in a GPO are listed below: Computer configuration settings are located in the Computer Configuration node. User configuration settings are

    • Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      Group Policy Terminology and Concepts

      What is Group Policy Group Policy is an Active Directory feature that provides the means for you to effectively and efficiently manage large numbers of computers. You can manage both user and computer configuration settings centrally, from one position of administration. You can define group policies as being a collection of user and computer configuration

    • Active Directory Operations Masters

      Active Directory Operations Masters

      When a change is made to a domain, the change is replicated across all of the domain controllers in the domain. Some changes, such as those made to the schema, are replicated across all of the domains in the forest. This replication is called multimaster replication. But few changes are practically not possible to perform

    • How to Delegate Administrator Privileges in Active Directory

      How to Delegate Administrator Privileges in Active Directory

      The primary reason to create organizational units is to distribute administrative tasks across the organization by delegating administrative control to other administrators. Delegation is especially important when a decentralized administrative model is developed. Delegation of administration is the process of decentralizing the responsibility for managing organizational units from a central administrator to other administrators. The

    • Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory is a distributed multimaster replicated database. All domain controllers host a full replica of the domain information for its own domain. Domain controllers in Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 environments hold a read/write copy of the Active Directory database. In these environments, changes can be made to the Active Directory database on

    • Understanding Trust Relationships

      Understanding Trust Relationships

      In the Windows NT domain model, domains had to be bound together through trust relationships simply because the SAM databases used in those domains could not be joined. What this meant was that where a domain trusted another Windows NT domain, the members of the domain could access network resources located in the other domain.

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