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    • Physical Structure of Active Directory

      Physical Structure of Active Directory

      In comparison to the logical structure, which performs administrative tasks, the Active Directory physical structure checks when and where logon and replication traffic occurs. The physical structure of Active Directory contains all the physical subnets present in your network like domain controllers and replication between domain controllers. The physical structure of Active Directory: Domain Controllers:

    • Active Directory Security Principal Accounts

      Active Directory Security Principal Accounts

      Understanding Active Directory Security Principal Accounts Active Directory consists of a considerable number of objects, and variety of objects, of which, security principal accounts are one. Security principal accounts are Active Directory objects that are assigned unique security identifiers (SIDs), and are therefore used in authentication and Active Directory security. A security principal account can

    • Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      On Overview on Group Policy Object (GPO) Implementation and the Group Policy Object Editor Group Policy settings are stored in a Group Policy Object (GPO). The types of Group Policy settings which can be stored in a GPO are listed below: Computer configuration settings are located in the Computer Configuration node. User configuration settings are

    • Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory or directory service management is a vital component of any administration process if Active Directory is implemented in the networking environment. The two types of management or administration methods that can be utilized to manage the directory service are: Administrative tools that utilize a graphical user interface (GUI). Command-line tools. Windows Server 2003

    • Understanding Trust Relationships

      Understanding Trust Relationships

      In the Windows NT domain model, domains had to be bound together through trust relationships simply because the SAM databases used in those domains could not be joined. What this meant was that where a domain trusted another Windows NT domain, the members of the domain could access network resources located in the other domain.

    • Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      The Domain is the core unit of logical structure in Active Directory. All objects that share a common directory database and trust relationship with other domain and security policies are known as Domains. Each domain stores information only about the objects that belong to that domain. All security polices and settings, such as administrative rights,

    • Global Catalog

      Global Catalog

      The global catalog is a distributed data repository that is stored in global catalog servers and issued via multimaster replication. It basically is composed of a representation (partial) of every object in the multidomain Active Directory forest that can also be searched. The global catalog is used because searches can be made faster because they

    • Active Directory Authentication Types

      Active Directory Authentication Types

      The two types of authentication are Mutual Authentication and NTLM. Mutual Authentication requires both the server and the client to identify them. NTLM only requires the client to be validated by the server. Two types of authentication are Mutual Authentication and NTLM Authentication. Mutual Authentication Mutual Authentication is a security feature in which a client

    • Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      A group can be defined as a collection of accounts that are grouped together so that Administrators can assign permissions and rights to the group as a single entity. This removes the need for an Administrator to individually assign permissions and rights to each account. Therefore, while a user account is associated with an individual

    • Group Policy

      Group Policy

      Group Policy gives users administrative control over people and computers in the user’s network. By using Group Policy, users can define the state of someone’s work environment once, then rely on Windows Server 2003 to continually force the Group Policy settings applied across an entire organization or to specific groups of people and computers. Group

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