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    • Deploying Software through Group Policy

      Deploying Software through Group Policy

      When Active Directory was launched in Windows 2000, one of its key design features was to ease the process of deploying software within an organization. To this end, Microsoft included the ability to deploy and distribute software with Group Policy. IntelliMirror technologies include Group Policy software installation to simplify the management necessary for large quantities

    • Active Directory Organizational Units

      Active Directory Organizational Units

      An object is a set of attributes that represents a network resource, say a user, a computer, a group policy, etc and object attributes are characteristics of that object stored in the directory. For example, some of the attributes of a user object might include the user's first name, last name, department, and e-mail address

    • Global Catalog

      Global Catalog

      The global catalog is a distributed data repository that is stored in global catalog servers and issued via multimaster replication. It basically is composed of a representation (partial) of every object in the multidomain Active Directory forest that can also be searched. The global catalog is used because searches can be made faster because they

    • Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Domain and forest functional levels provide a means of enabling additional domain and forest-wide Active Directory features, remove outdated backward compatibility in an environment, and improve Active Directory performance and security. In Windows 2000, the terminology for domain functional levels was domain modes. Forests in Windows 2000 have one mode and domains can have the

    • Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      The Domain is the core unit of logical structure in Active Directory. All objects that share a common directory database and trust relationship with other domain and security policies are known as Domains. Each domain stores information only about the objects that belong to that domain. All security polices and settings, such as administrative rights,

    • Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Active Directory fulfills all the needs of an organization by designing a directory structure. It provides flexibility in designing the business structure according to current and future needs for an organization, so it should be examined prior to installing active directory. In Active Directory, resources are organized in a logical structure, and this grouping of

    • Active Directory

      Active Directory

      Active Directory (AD) is a structure used on computers and servers running the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS). AD is used to store network, domain, and user information and was originally created by Microsoft in 1996. It was first deployed on Microsoft Windows 2000. Active directories provide a number of functions to include providing information

    • Troubleshooting Group Policy

      Troubleshooting Group Policy

      Through Group Policy, a wide variety of user and computer configuration settings can be applied to users and computers in Active Directory. If an Active Directory environment includes a hierarchy with many different organizational unit (OU) levels, when group policies are applied at these different levels within the hierarchy, it is almost certain that Group

    • Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      Understanding Group Types and Scopes

      A group can be defined as a collection of accounts that are grouped together so that Administrators can assign permissions and rights to the group as a single entity. This removes the need for an Administrator to individually assign permissions and rights to each account. Therefore, while a user account is associated with an individual

    • Understanding Organizational Units

      Understanding Organizational Units

      An organizational unit (OU) is a container that logically organizes and groups Active Directory objects within domains. OUs are not part of the DNS namespace. They organize Active Directory objects into logical administrative groups. OUs therefore serve as containers in which users can create and manage Active Directory objects. OUs are considered the smallest unit

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