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    • Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory or directory service management is a vital component of any administration process if Active Directory is implemented in the networking environment. The two types of management or administration methods that can be utilized to manage the directory service are: Administrative tools that utilize a graphical user interface (GUI). Command-line tools. Windows Server 2003

    • Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Understanding the Different Server Roles The server roles that exist in a networking environment are standalone servers, member servers and domain controllers. A standalone server is a computer that is not member of a domain, and can be a computer running Windows NT 4, Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003. A test server is a

    • Understanding Forests and Domains

      Understanding Forests and Domains

      A domain is a collection of computers and resources that share a common security database, in this case, the Active Directory database. Computers in the domain also have a common namespace. A namespace is the hierarchical grouping of service and object names that are stored in Active Directory and DNS. Active Directory and DNS namespaces

    • Planning a Group Policy Strategy

      Planning a Group Policy Strategy

      On Overview on Group Policy Before you can consider to even begin planning a Group Policy implementation in your organization, you have to understand a few important aspects of Group Policy. Microsoft initially introduced group policies in Windows NT to assist administrators in managing the desktop configuration settings of users and computers. Windows Server 2000

    • Active Directory Objects

      Active Directory Objects

      The Active Directory data store, also referred to as directory, contains data on users, groups, computers, and on which resources these users, groups, and computers can access. It holds all Active Directory information. Each domain controller within a domain holds a readable/writable replica of the Active Directory data store that consists of information pertaining to

    • Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      The Domain is the core unit of logical structure in Active Directory. All objects that share a common directory database and trust relationship with other domain and security policies are known as Domains. Each domain stores information only about the objects that belong to that domain. All security polices and settings, such as administrative rights,

    • Active Directory

      Active Directory

      Active Directory (AD) is a structure used on computers and servers running the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS). AD is used to store network, domain, and user information and was originally created by Microsoft in 1996. It was first deployed on Microsoft Windows 2000. Active directories provide a number of functions to include providing information

    • Global Catalog in Active Directory

      Global Catalog in Active Directory

      Domains and Forests can also share resources available in active directory. These resources are searched by Global Catalog across domains and forests and this search is transparent to user. For example, if you make a search for all of the printers in a forest, this search goes to global catalog server for its query and

    • Active Directory Security Principal Accounts

      Active Directory Security Principal Accounts

      Understanding Active Directory Security Principal Accounts Active Directory consists of a considerable number of objects, and variety of objects, of which, security principal accounts are one. Security principal accounts are Active Directory objects that are assigned unique security identifiers (SIDs), and are therefore used in authentication and Active Directory security. A security principal account can

    • Directory Partitions

      Directory Partitions

      The Active Directory database is logically separated into directory partitions: Schema partition Configuration partition Domain partition Application partition Each partition is a unit of replication and each partition has its own replication topology. Replication occurs between directory partition replicas. Minimum two directory partitions are common among all domain controllers in the same forest: the schema

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