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    • Understanding Trust Relationships

      Understanding Trust Relationships

      In the Windows NT domain model, domains had to be bound together through trust relationships simply because the SAM databases used in those domains could not be joined. What this meant was that where a domain trusted another Windows NT domain, the members of the domain could access network resources located in the other domain.

    • Global Catalog in Active Directory

      Global Catalog in Active Directory

      Domains and Forests can also share resources available in active directory. These resources are searched by Global Catalog across domains and forests and this search is transparent to user. For example, if you make a search for all of the printers in a forest, this search goes to global catalog server for its query and

    • Active Directory Authentication Types

      Active Directory Authentication Types

      The two types of authentication are Mutual Authentication and NTLM. Mutual Authentication requires both the server and the client to identify them. NTLM only requires the client to be validated by the server. Two types of authentication are Mutual Authentication and NTLM Authentication. Mutual Authentication Mutual Authentication is a security feature in which a client

    • Understanding Forests and Domains

      Understanding Forests and Domains

      A domain is a collection of computers and resources that share a common security database, in this case, the Active Directory database. Computers in the domain also have a common namespace. A namespace is the hierarchical grouping of service and object names that are stored in Active Directory and DNS. Active Directory and DNS namespaces

    • Understanding Organizational Units

      Understanding Organizational Units

      An organizational unit (OU) is a container that logically organizes and groups Active Directory objects within domains. OUs are not part of the DNS namespace. They organize Active Directory objects into logical administrative groups. OUs therefore serve as containers in which users can create and manage Active Directory objects. OUs are considered the smallest unit

    • Active Directory Organizational Units

      Active Directory Organizational Units

      An object is a set of attributes that represents a network resource, say a user, a computer, a group policy, etc and object attributes are characteristics of that object stored in the directory. For example, some of the attributes of a user object might include the user's first name, last name, department, and e-mail address

    • Publishing Resources in Active Directory

      Publishing Resources in Active Directory

      What Resources can be published in Active Directory When you make Active Directory objects available to users, you are publishing the Active Directory resource. The resources that can be published in Active Directory include the Active Directory resources listed below: User objects Computer objects Printer objects Folders and files Network services The two primary published

    • Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding the Operations Master Roles Active Directory operates in a multi-master replication manner. What this means is that each domain controller in the domain holds a readable, writable replica of the Active Directory data store. In multi-master replication, any domain controller is able to change objects within Active Directory. Multi-master replication is ideal for the

    • Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      Implementing and Managing Group Policy Objects (GPOs)

      On Overview on Group Policy Object (GPO) Implementation and the Group Policy Object Editor Group Policy settings are stored in a Group Policy Object (GPO). The types of Group Policy settings which can be stored in a GPO are listed below: Computer configuration settings are located in the Computer Configuration node. User configuration settings are

    • Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Domain and forest functional levels provide a means of enabling additional domain and forest-wide Active Directory features, remove outdated backward compatibility in an environment, and improve Active Directory performance and security. In Windows 2000, the terminology for domain functional levels was domain modes. Forests in Windows 2000 have one mode and domains can have the

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