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    • Deploying Software through Group Policy

      Deploying Software through Group Policy

      When Active Directory was launched in Windows 2000, one of its key design features was to ease the process of deploying software within an organization. To this end, Microsoft included the ability to deploy and distribute software with Group Policy. IntelliMirror technologies include Group Policy software installation to simplify the management necessary for large quantities

    • Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Configuring and Troubleshooting Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory is a distributed multimaster replicated database. All domain controllers host a full replica of the domain information for its own domain. Domain controllers in Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 environments hold a read/write copy of the Active Directory database. In these environments, changes can be made to the Active Directory database on

    • Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Logical Structure of an Active Directory

      Active Directory fulfills all the needs of an organization by designing a directory structure. It provides flexibility in designing the business structure according to current and future needs for an organization, so it should be examined prior to installing active directory. In Active Directory, resources are organized in a logical structure, and this grouping of

    • Active Directory Operations Masters

      Active Directory Operations Masters

      When a change is made to a domain, the change is replicated across all of the domain controllers in the domain. Some changes, such as those made to the schema, are replicated across all of the domains in the forest. This replication is called multimaster replication. But few changes are practically not possible to perform

    • Physical Structure of Active Directory

      Physical Structure of Active Directory

      In comparison to the logical structure, which performs administrative tasks, the Active Directory physical structure checks when and where logon and replication traffic occurs. The physical structure of Active Directory contains all the physical subnets present in your network like domain controllers and replication between domain controllers. The physical structure of Active Directory: Domain Controllers:

    • Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Domain and forest functional levels provide a means of enabling additional domain and forest-wide Active Directory features, remove outdated backward compatibility in an environment, and improve Active Directory performance and security. In Windows 2000, the terminology for domain functional levels was domain modes. Forests in Windows 2000 have one mode and domains can have the

    • The Global Catalog Server

      The Global Catalog Server

      The Global Catalog (GC) is an important component in Active Directory because it serves as the central information store of the Active Directory objects located in domains and forests. Because the GC maintains a list of the Active Directory objects in domains and forests without actually including all information on the objects and it is

    • Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Creating and Managing Domain Controllers

      Understanding the Different Server Roles The server roles that exist in a networking environment are standalone servers, member servers and domain controllers. A standalone server is a computer that is not member of a domain, and can be a computer running Windows NT 4, Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003. A test server is a

    • Active Directory Replication

      Active Directory Replication

      The initial Windows NT versions were designed as single master network environments. The primary domain controller (PDC) was responsible for managing the domain database’s master copy. The PDC was therefore responsible for replicating any changes to the backup domain controllers (BDCs). In these environments, any changes had to be performed on the PDC, which then

    • Publishing Resources in Active Directory

      Publishing Resources in Active Directory

      What Resources can be published in Active Directory When you make Active Directory objects available to users, you are publishing the Active Directory resource. The resources that can be published in Active Directory include the Active Directory resources listed below: User objects Computer objects Printer objects Folders and files Network services The two primary published

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