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    • Physical Structure of Active Directory

      Physical Structure of Active Directory

      In comparison to the logical structure, which performs administrative tasks, the Active Directory physical structure checks when and where logon and replication traffic occurs. The physical structure of Active Directory contains all the physical subnets present in your network like domain controllers and replication between domain controllers. The physical structure of Active Directory: Domain Controllers:

    • Active Directory Organizational Units

      Active Directory Organizational Units

      An object is a set of attributes that represents a network resource, say a user, a computer, a group policy, etc and object attributes are characteristics of that object stored in the directory. For example, some of the attributes of a user object might include the user's first name, last name, department, and e-mail address

    • Active Directory Security

      Active Directory Security

      Active Directory security is determined by the following components: * Security groups: A security group is a made up of a set of users, and is created to assign permissions to access resources, and to assign user rights to group members. Permissions control access to resources, while user rights define what actions users can perform.

    • Active Directory

      Active Directory

      Active Directory (AD) is a structure used on computers and servers running the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS). AD is used to store network, domain, and user information and was originally created by Microsoft in 1996. It was first deployed on Microsoft Windows 2000. Active directories provide a number of functions to include providing information

    • Directory Partitions

      Directory Partitions

      The Active Directory database is logically separated into directory partitions: Schema partition Configuration partition Domain partition Application partition Each partition is a unit of replication and each partition has its own replication topology. Replication occurs between directory partition replicas. Minimum two directory partitions are common among all domain controllers in the same forest: the schema

    • Understanding Trust Relationships

      Understanding Trust Relationships

      In the Windows NT domain model, domains had to be bound together through trust relationships simply because the SAM databases used in those domains could not be joined. What this meant was that where a domain trusted another Windows NT domain, the members of the domain could access network resources located in the other domain.

    • Understanding Forests and Domains

      Understanding Forests and Domains

      A domain is a collection of computers and resources that share a common security database, in this case, the Active Directory database. Computers in the domain also have a common namespace. A namespace is the hierarchical grouping of service and object names that are stored in Active Directory and DNS. Active Directory and DNS namespaces

    • Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      Tree and Forest in Active Directory

      The Domain is the core unit of logical structure in Active Directory. All objects that share a common directory database and trust relationship with other domain and security policies are known as Domains. Each domain stores information only about the objects that belong to that domain. All security polices and settings, such as administrative rights,

    • Active Directory Operations Masters

      Active Directory Operations Masters

      When a change is made to a domain, the change is replicated across all of the domain controllers in the domain. Some changes, such as those made to the schema, are replicated across all of the domains in the forest. This replication is called multimaster replication. But few changes are practically not possible to perform

    • Understanding Organizational Units

      Understanding Organizational Units

      An organizational unit (OU) is a container that logically organizes and groups Active Directory objects within domains. OUs are not part of the DNS namespace. They organize Active Directory objects into logical administrative groups. OUs therefore serve as containers in which users can create and manage Active Directory objects. OUs are considered the smallest unit

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