• Main Menu
  • Microsoft Active Directory

    • Physical Structure of Active Directory

      Physical Structure of Active Directory

      In comparison to the logical structure, which performs administrative tasks, the Active Directory physical structure checks when and where logon and replication traffic occurs. The physical structure of Active Directory contains all the physical subnets present in your network like domain controllers and replication between domain controllers. The physical structure of Active Directory: Domain Controllers:

    • Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding and Managing Operations Master Roles

      Understanding the Operations Master Roles Active Directory operates in a multi-master replication manner. What this means is that each domain controller in the domain holds a readable, writable replica of the Active Directory data store. In multi-master replication, any domain controller is able to change objects within Active Directory. Multi-master replication is ideal for the

    • Managing Recipient Objects, Address Lists, and Distribution and Administrative Groups

      Managing Recipient Objects, Address Lists, and Distribution and Administrative Groups

      Recipient Objects Overview Active Directory objects such as user accounts, contacts and groups become recipient objects when e-mail address information is added to the object. The public folder is another type of recipient object. A public folder does not however usually have its own an email address. Exchange Server 2003 supports the following types of

    • Global Catalog in Active Directory

      Global Catalog in Active Directory

      Domains and Forests can also share resources available in active directory. These resources are searched by Global Catalog across domains and forests and this search is transparent to user. For example, if you make a search for all of the printers in a forest, this search goes to global catalog server for its query and

    • Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Forest and Domain Functional Levels

      Domain and forest functional levels provide a means of enabling additional domain and forest-wide Active Directory features, remove outdated backward compatibility in an environment, and improve Active Directory performance and security. In Windows 2000, the terminology for domain functional levels was domain modes. Forests in Windows 2000 have one mode and domains can have the

    • Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory Management Tools

      Active Directory or directory service management is a vital component of any administration process if Active Directory is implemented in the networking environment. The two types of management or administration methods that can be utilized to manage the directory service are: Administrative tools that utilize a graphical user interface (GUI). Command-line tools. Windows Server 2003

    • Understanding Forests and Domains

      Understanding Forests and Domains

      A domain is a collection of computers and resources that share a common security database, in this case, the Active Directory database. Computers in the domain also have a common namespace. A namespace is the hierarchical grouping of service and object names that are stored in Active Directory and DNS. Active Directory and DNS namespaces

    • Active Directory

      Active Directory

      Active Directory (AD) is a structure used on computers and servers running the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS). AD is used to store network, domain, and user information and was originally created by Microsoft in 1996. It was first deployed on Microsoft Windows 2000. Active directories provide a number of functions to include providing information

    • Managing Active Directory Performance

      Managing Active Directory Performance

      An Overview on Performance Monitoring and Management Performance monitoring is the process of accurately and consistently measuring performance, so that you can identify any potential bottlenecks which may be impairing the way in which Active Directory performs within your environment. A bottleneck can take place on any Windows subsystem or network component, and occurs when

    • Active Directory Terminology and Concepts

      Active Directory Terminology and Concepts

      The Active Directory data store (directory) is the database that holds all directory information such as information on users, computer, groups, other objects, and the objects that users can access. It also includes other network components. The Active Directory data store is stored on the server’s hard disk by means of the Ntds.dit file. The

    microsoft-active-directory
    485 queries in 0.946 seconds.