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    • Attic Antennas

      Attic Antennas

      An attic antenna is one that is mounted inside of an attic in order to provide maximum range as well as protection from rain, snow, sun, wind, and animals. Attic antennas are rather common and provide quality reception for those who live in rural areas, away from most radio transmitters. While attic antennas do not

    • dBm

      dBm

      dBm is the standard unit of measure for levels of power based on a one milliwatt (mW) reference signal. The dBm measurement is very similar to dB (decibel); however, dB is a relative measure of the power of an input signal while dBm is always an absolute value based on a single milliwatt. If there

    • Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum

      Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum

      The Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) is a means of transmitting radio signals by shifting a carrier across a number of channels with a pseudorandom sequence that the sending and receiving station knows beforehand. The method is used as a multiple access process in the FH-CDMA (Frequency Hopping Code Division Multiple Access) transmission scheme. What Are

    • Satellite Radio

      Satellite Radio

      Satellite radio refers to a number of subscription-based radio broadcasting programs that are available in the US, Europe, and elsewhere that are dependent on satellites to provide mobile users with constant radio access. While terrestrial-based FM radio stations only provide radio broadcasts to a specific area, usually confined to the city they are located in,

    • FRS (Family Radio Service)

      FRS (Family Radio Service)

      FRS (Family Radio Service) is an unlicensed service. FRS (Family Radio Service) consists of 14 UHF channels on FM. FRS Channel 1 is unofficially used as a common call channel. FRS (Family Radio Service) shares channels 1 through 7 with GMRS, and many FRS radios are also GMRS radios. The maximum allowable power for a

    • UHF (Ultra High Frequency)

      UHF (Ultra High Frequency)

      UHF is an acronym for a band of radio frequencies often used to broadcast television signals. Mobile phones and satellite radio also use UHF signals. The letters ‘UHF’ stand for: Ultra High Frequency. UHF Frequencies Any radio frequency between 300 MegaHertz (MHz) and 3,000 MHz (or 3 GigaHertz) is considered to be in the UHF

    • Internet Repeater

      Internet Repeater

      An Internet repeater is a device that allows amateur radio operators to communicate with each other over the Internet, much like how VoIP software allows telephone operators to communicate with each other over the Internet. Internet repeaters should not be confused with wireless repeaters, which allow users to extend the range of a wireless network.

    • What is VSWR?

      What is VSWR?

      VSWR (Voltage Standing Wave Ratio) is a metric commonly used with antenna systems for ham or shortwave radio communication. VSWR is normally defined as a ratio with a 1:1 VSWR, indicating that there is an exact or perfect match between all antenna system elements. The VSWR can also be expressed by comparing Vmax with Vmin

    • FCC ID

      FCC ID

      FCC ID stands for Federal Communications Commission Identification. An FCC ID is the number found in all computer hardware components. FCC ID numbers, usually found on the circuit boards, are helpful in finding information about the manufacturers of the hardware devices. An FCC ID has 2 elements. The first is a three-character Grantee Code which

    • How Sunspots Affect Radio Reception

      How Sunspots Affect Radio Reception

      In order to understand how sunspots effect radio reception, you need to understand that the light waves and radio waves that the sun emits are both categorized as electromagnetic (EM) radiation. While light waves are visible to the human eye, they are still electromagnetic waves that oscillate. There are many electro magnetic waves, some oscillate

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