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    • 802.1X

      802.1X

      802.1x is an IEEE standard that provides the definition for the encapsulation of EAP (Extensible Authentication Protocol) and is also known as EAPOL (EAP over LAN). The standard was first defined in 2001 and later clarified in 2004 to be used with other IEEE 802 working group defined technologies such as the 802.11 wireless standard.

    • DNS Cache

      DNS Cache

      DNS (Domain Name Server) is the web server used to resolve a website’s name to its Internet Protocol (IP) address. DNS servers across the Internet are either considered authoritative with regards to a website name and corresponding IP address or are required to verify the IP address with another DNS server that will in turn

    • Denial of Service (DoS) Attacks

      Denial of Service (DoS) Attacks

      A Denial of Service (DoS) attack is one that attempts to prevent the victim from being able to use all or part of his/her network connection. A denial of service attack may target a user to prevent him/her from making outgoing connections on the network. It may also target an entire organization to either prevent

    • RSN (Robust Secure Network)

      RSN (Robust Secure Network)

      RSN (Robust Secure Network) is a protocol for establishing secure communications over an 802.11 wireless network. RSN (Robust Secure Network) is part of the 802.11i standard. The RSN Protocol Process The RSN protocol functions as follows: The wireless NIC sends a Probe Request. The wireless access point sends a Probe Response with an RSN Information

    • 802.1Q

      802.1Q

      802.1Q is also known as IEEE 802.1Q or VLAN tagging. It defines a virtual local area network. It is a protocol that allows virtual LANs to communicate with one another using a 3-layered router. It was developed as a part of IEEE 802. Why Was The 802.1Q Standard Developed? Large networks use up a lot

    • Hostname

      Hostname

      The term 'HostName' refers to the name given to a particular machine that is part of a computer network. The machine can be a simple computer, a network server, a network printer, a fax machine or copier, a modem, a network storage device or any other electronic device connected to a network. Each of these

    • DHCP Scope

      DHCP Scope

      A DHCP scope is a valid range of IP addresses that are available for assignment or lease to client computers on a particular subnet. In a DHCP server, a scope is configured to determine the address pool of IPs that the server can provide to DHCP clients. Scopes determine which IP addresses are provided to

    • How Does WiFi Work?

      How Does WiFi Work?

      Over the past decade, WiFi/wireless networking has become very popular. Low cost and simplicity are some of the reasons why WiFi is so popular. Today,  it is almost impossible to buy a laptop that doesn’t have a wireless card built into the screen, which is why WiFi’s popularity continues to grow. What Does WiFi Stand For?

    • Wireless Antennae

      Wireless Antennae

      Wireless networks are great, when they work. A weak wireless signal can mean real trouble. One of the best ways to improve a wireless signal is to replace the antenna on one or both ends of the connection with a better wireless antenna. Types of Wireless Antennae Wireless antennae fall into five general categories: Omni

    • Ethernet at the Physical Layer

      Ethernet at the Physical Layer

      Ethernet is the most popular Local Area Network architecture that was jointly developed by Digital Equipment Corporation, Intel Corporation and Xerox Corporation. It consists of certain specifications and standards as well as hardware devices and components. Ethernet provides services corresponding to physical layer and data link layer of the OSI reference model. Each Ethernet physical

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