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    • How to Measure Signal Quality

      How to Measure Signal Quality

      Most people usually look to Signal to Noise Ratio to measure the signal quality of either audio or video communications. Signal to noise ratio is usually written either S/N or SNR. Most of the time the signal to noise ratio is measured in decibels. A decibel is a measure of power or loudness. Not to

    • Half Duplex and Full Duplex

      Half Duplex and Full Duplex

      Duplex simply means that the communications device enables users to talk to someone in another location and the person in the other location to respond to the user via the same type of device. As an example, when someone makes a telephone call, he/she is engaging in a duplex procedure. The same is true when

    • Signal to Noise Ratio

      Signal to Noise Ratio

      The Signal to Noise Ratio is a ratio of desired signal to undesired signal (noise) in the average power level of a transmission. The signal is what you are measuring that is the result of the presence of your analyte. Noise is extraneous information that can interfere with or alter the signal. It can not

    • Mirroring

      Mirroring

      Mirroring is the automated process of writing data to two drives simultaneously. Mirroring is used to provide redundancy, backup, multiple concurrent accesses and uninterrupted accessibility. If one drive fails, the redundant drive will continue to store the data and provide access to it. The failed drive can then be replaced and the drive set can

    • How Does a USB Flash Drive Work?

      How Does a USB Flash Drive Work?

      USB flash drives provide users with an enormous level of satisfaction and accessibility due to their massive storage capacities, low cost, and small size. USB flash drives serve an important role in our society and have a precedence over other means of data transportation. Where as computers used to have floppy disk drives as well

    • SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data)

      SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data)

      SIMD (Single Instruction Multiple Data) is a computer science method of combining multiple operations into a single computer instruction. The total number of operations combined is normally a factor of the power of two. The employment of SIMD results in significant savings in speed for algorithms designed to work in parallel. The technology is used

    • eSATAp

      eSATAp

      eSATAp is a high speed connectivity option for external storage devices like portable hard disks (HDD), Solid State Drives (SSD), and Networked Attached Storage (NAS). It is also referred to as eSATA/USB combo port and Power Over eSATA. This connection is 3 times as fast as USB 2.0, and its speed is comparable to USB 3.0

    • High Definition Audio

      High Definition Audio

      High Definition Audio, also known as HD Audio, is an audio standard created by Intel to be used on their chipsets, i.e. it is a standard for high-quality on-board audio. HD Audio was designed to replace the Audio Codec 97 (AC'97) standard that Intel released in 1997. The main achievement of the AC'97 specification was

    • eSATA (External Serial Advanced Technology Attachment)

      eSATA (External Serial Advanced Technology Attachment)

      eSATA stands for External Serial Advanced Technology Attachment. It is meant to be an external interface for SATA technologies. SATA or Serial ATA (Advanced Technology Attachment) is the next generation of drive interfaces, its predecessor being the Parallel ATA (PATA). PATA Anyone who has opened up their computer must have noticed the flat, 40-wire parallel

    • FLV Files

      FLV Files

      Over the last couple of years video has become a staple of the internet. Not only have computers become more powerful and equipped to handle video images, but many websites now rely on video as either a source of entertainment or a way to transmit information. One of the most popular video files found on

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