• Main Menu
  • Audio-Video

    • Satellite Receivers

      Satellite Receivers

      Satellite receivers come in standard, HD tuners, DVR, or FTA formats. In a standard receiver, the digital broadcast signal is decoded and presented in the television in an analog format. Most satellite receivers feature an Electronic Program Guide (EPG), which contains a list of the available channels and programming. HD Receivers Made for high-definition satellites

    • Computer TV Tuner

      Computer TV Tuner

      A computer TV tuner is a computer hardware device that converts the standard analog TV signals it receives and demodulates them into their digital form. Sometimes the TV tuner capability is provided on the graphics card itself, for example, in the All-in-Wonder series manufactured by ATI Technologies. Such graphics cards are higher priced. TV Tuner

    • Dish 500

      Dish 500

      Dish 500 is a satellite dish provided by Dish Network that was developed to replace the discontinued Dish 300 model. Dish 500 is slightly larger than the Dish 300 model at 20” in diameter, but is capable of receiving broadcasts from both the 110°W and the 119°W orbital locations owned by EchoStar, effectively doubling the

    • HDMI Optical Switch

      HDMI Optical Switch

      HDMI stands for High Definition Multimedia Interface; HDMI is an audio video interface that is used to transmit both digital audio and video streams of data which are uncompressed and encrypted. HDMI is slowly becoming the de facto standard for connecting digital audio and video sources to one another. For instance, many consumer electronics such

    • How to Convert Audio Tape to MP3

      How to Convert Audio Tape to MP3

      For many, MP3 is the perfect digital format. Music in this format sounds similar to CD music quality. MP3 files are much smaller than the standard CD WAV file and using MP3 is free. It seems the only drawback of using MP3s is the fact that most music is stored on media that are not

    • How Television Works

      How Television Works

      Most people spend hours each day watching programming on their TV set, however, many people might wonder how in fact television works. There are many parts to this process and many technologies that are involved. Following are the most important processes and technologies involved in making television work. Main Elements of the TV Process There

    • Who Invented the Television?

      Who Invented the Television?

      Who invented the television is a hotly debated question. The invention of the television grew out of the invention of the radio. Since you can easily send sound through the air waves many inventors starting thinking of the possibility of not only sound being sent through the airwaves, but also images. On December 2, 1922,

    • VideoGuard

      VideoGuard

      VideoGuard is an encryption method that NDS produced. It is used for conditional broadcasting services such as broadband television and the Internet. Since satellites, radio towers, and all other broadcasting equipment broadcast signals without discretion to which subscribers receive them, VideoGuard is necessary in order to distinguish which television channels, Internet features, and other services subscribers are

    • How to Convert MP3 to WAV

      The MP3 (Moving Pictures Experts Group) audio file format is compressed in order to allow playback and exchange over the Internet and other size constrained media. Although most audio playback devices and software support the MP3 format, the WAV (Waveform audio) format is uncompressed and capable of storing more detail when further manipulating audio files.

    • PDTV (Pure Digital Television)

      PDTV (Pure Digital Television)

      In the age of HDTV, it is important to receive the best signals available to take advantage of the higher image quality that such display technology made possible. Pure Digital Television (PDTV) is the answer to this need. PDTV makes it possible to get direct feed from the video source and send it directly to

    audio-video
    448 queries in 0.496 seconds.