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    • What is Mars Made Of?

      What is Mars Made Of?

      The planet Mars has held a place of intrigue with humanity for many centuries. Also known as the “Red Planet,” Mars can be seen with the naked eye and looks red due to the large red desert covering its surface and the presence of a large amount of ferric oxide. As the fourth planet in

    • How Nuclear Fusion Works

      How Nuclear Fusion Works

      Nuclear Fusion relates to nuclear power. So let us start with the process involved for getting nuclear power. There are, mainly, two processes involved: 1) Nuclear Fission Most of the present day nuclear power plants use this process to get power. This process uses a conventional method of splitting one atom into two. Here high-energy

    • How is Chemical Energy Used

      How is Chemical Energy Used

      There are many different kinds of energy but the single most widely used in society as well as in nature is chemical energy. Chemical energy allows energy to be stored for later use and it is also easy to access. Without chemical energy, many of the luxuries and even basic necessities that people have grown

    • What is a Diopter?

      What is a Diopter?

      A diopter is a lens that bends light in order to magnify an object. Diopters can be used to enlarge small objects or see across far distances and are generally integrated into other objects in order to maximize efficiency and accessibility. A diopter can also refer to a measurement that describes a lens’s optical power

    • What is Luminol?

      What is Luminol?

      Luminol is a substance that has a blue or green glow when it comes in contact with blood, certain metals, or other oxidizing agents. It is made from hydrazine and hydrogen peroxide and exhibits chemiluminescence, the process by which light is emitted from a chemical reaction. Luminol has many uses, but is most widely used

    • How Do Quartz Watches Work?

      How Do Quartz Watches Work?

      A quartz watch is one that uses a tiny, paper thin piece of quartz to measure the time. An electrical pulse is sent into the quartz which causes it to vibrate. This vibrating is then picked up by the watch and it is measured. Then, the vibrating pulse is sent to the hand which turns

    • Brookfield Viscometer

      Brookfield Viscometer

      The Brookfield Viscometer makes it possible to measure viscosity by employing techniques in viscometry. Viscometers (which can also be called viscosimeters) can measure viscosity through the varying flow conditions of the sample material being tested. They employ a spindle on a shaft that is designed to be dipped or immersed into a liquid that is

    • Seebeck Effect

      Seebeck Effect

      The Seebeck Effect was first discovered in 1821. It describes the thermoelectric phenomenon that results when the temperature differences between dissimilar metals in a circuit are converted into electric current. This is one of three similar processes that relate to conductivity, temperature, and thermoelectricity that was discovered in the 1800s. The Thomson Effect was first

    • Potassium Carbonate Dihydrate

      Potassium Carbonate Dihydrate

      Potassium carbonate dihydrate (K2CO3.2H2O) is a white chemical. Salt from potassium carbonate and water from the dihydrate are mixed into a deliquescent (wet salt). It is a strong alkaline solution that garners a variety of uses. The salt tastes like salt and alkaline material. Potassium carbonate dihydrate is generally used as a nutritional supplement in

    • Dielectric Constant

      Dielectric Constant

      A dielectric constant measures the extent that a material concentrates electrostatic flux and is also known as the relative static permittivity, static dielectric constant, and relative dielectric constant. It is essential when determining if a substance can be used in a capacitor or various chemistry and physics applications. A material’s dielectric constant value must be

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